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subject_dic = {}
inputFile = open(filename)
for line in inputFile:
    split_line = string.split(line, ',')
    subject_dic[split_line[0]] = tuple(split_line[1:3])
print subject_dic

I'm getting

{'6.08': ('1', '10\n'), '6.09': ('3', '7\n'), '6.19': ('8', '19'), '6.10': ('8', '18\n'), '6.00': ('10', '1\n'), '6.01': ('5', '4\n'), '6.02': ('5', '6\n'), '6.03': ('2', '9\n'), '6.04': ('1', '2\n'), '6.05': ('1', '18\n'), '6.06': ('5', '19\n'), '6.07': ('2', '10\n'), '6.13': ('9', '16\n'), '6.18': ('10', '4\n'), '6.15': ('10', '6\n'), '6.16': ('6', '9\n'), '6.12': ('6', '3\n'), '6.17': ('9', '3\n'), '6.14': ('10', '8\n'), '6.11': ('6', '8\n')}

but I don't know how to remove '\n' from the ends of my tuples. This is really simple but I can't find out how to do this. It's because I'm reading vertically from a file (hence the newline) but I don't want that '\n' in my dictionary.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
By the way, you can and should use string methods over functions in the string module, so the third line becomes line.split(','). – delnan Apr 15 '11 at 14:24
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're not working with a ridiculously large file, you can actually avoid having to use .strip() at all. If you read in the entire file as a string using .read() and then perform .splitlines() on that string.

Here is an example. I commented out your code where I changed things. I changed the example not to use slicing in exchange for explicit variable assignment.

subject_dic = {}
inputFile = open(filename)

# Turn "line1\nline2\n" into ['line1', 'line2']
inputData = inputFile.read().splitlines()

#for line in inputFile:
for line in inputData:
    #split_line = string.split(line, ',')
    #subject_dic[split_line[0]] = tuple(split_line[1:3])
    mykey, myval1, myval2 = line.split(',') # Strings always have .split()
    subject_dic[mykey] = (myval1, myval2) # Explicit tuple assignment

print subject_dic

Outputs:

{'6.00': ('10', '1'),
 '6.01': ('5', '4'),
 '6.02': ('5', '6'),
 '6.03': ('2', '9'),
 '6.04': ('1', '2'),
 '6.05': ('1', '18'),
 '6.06': ('5', '19'),
 '6.07': ('2', '10'),
 '6.08': ('1', '10'),
 '6.09': ('3', '7'),
 '6.10': ('8', '18'),
 '6.11': ('6', '8'),
 '6.12': ('6', '3'),
 '6.13': ('9', '16'),
 '6.14': ('10', '8'),
 '6.15': ('10', '6'),
 '6.16': ('6', '9'),
 '6.17': ('9', '3'),
 '6.18': ('10', '4'),
 '6.19': ('8', '19')}
share|improve this answer
split_line = split_line.strip()

See here.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for educating not just telling. – myusuf3 Apr 15 '11 at 14:26
    
Now my next question is how do I convert the tuple elements to integers? Is there a mapping function on tuples that does this? I can't find it. – Glassjawed Apr 15 '11 at 16:29
    
Slightly better split_line = line.strip().split(). – martineau Apr 15 '11 at 16:38
    
@Glassjawed: Yes there is. It's named map(). – martineau Apr 15 '11 at 16:40

Use strip on the lines to trim off the new lines.

str.strip([chars])

Return a copy of the string with the leading and trailing characters removed. The chars argument is a string specifying the set of characters to be removed. If omitted or None, the chars argument defaults to removing whitespace. The chars argument is not a prefix or suffix; rather, all combinations of its values are stripped:

share|improve this answer
line = line.strip() 

at the beginning of the loop.

share|improve this answer

This should work:

subject_dic = {}
inputFile = open(filename) 
for line in map(lambda x: x.strip(), inputFile):
    split_line = string.split(line, ',')
    subject_dic[split_line[0]] = tuple(split_line[1:3])
print subject_dic
share|improve this answer

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