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Can you list all possible array init. syntax that is possible with c#. It gets really confusing to know when it is an array initializer or a seperate declaration.

Note: I've searched the MSDN, google it but there isn't an all-in-one guide.

Edit: I'm using .NET 3.5 + c#

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For which version of C#, .NET Framework? –  Darin Dimitrov Apr 15 '11 at 14:28
    
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4 Answers 4

up vote 67 down vote accepted

These are the current declaration and initialization methods for a simple array.

string[] array = new string[2]; // creates array of length 2, default values
string[] array = new string[] { "A", "B" }; // creates populated array of length 2
string[] array = { "A" , "B" }; // creates populated array of length 2

Note that other techniques of obtaining arrays exist, such as the Linq ToArray() extensions on IEnumerable<T>.

Also note that in the declarations above, the first two could replace the string[] on the left with var (C# 3+), as the information on the right is enough to infer the proper type. The third line must be written as displayed, as array initialization syntax alone is not enough to satisfy the compiler's demands. So if you're into the whole brevity thing, the above could be written as

var array = new string[2]; // creates array of length 2, default values
var array = new string[] { "A", "B" }; // creates populated array of length 2
string[] array = { "A" , "B" }; // creates populated array of length 2
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@Joshua, I suggest moving the acceptance tick over to Eric Lippert's answer. His is much more complete and will serve a greater benefit to those with similar questions. –  Anthony Pegram Apr 15 '11 at 14:52
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The array creation syntaxes in C# that are expressions are:

new int[3]
new int[3] { 10, 20, 30 }
new int[] { 10, 20, 30 }
new[] { 10, 20, 30 }

In the first one, the size may be any non-negative integral value and the array elements are initialized to the default values.

In the second one, the size must be a constant and the number of elements given must match. There must be an implicit conversion from the given elements to the given array element type.

In the third one, the elements must be implicitly convertible to the element type, and the size is determined from the number of elements given.

In the fourth one the type of the array element is inferred by computing the best type, if there is one, of all the given elements that have types. All the elements must be implicitly convertible to that type. The size is determined from the number of elements given. This syntax was introduced in C# 3.0.

There is also a syntax which may only be used in a declaration:

int[] x = { 10, 20, 30 };

The elements must be implicitly convertible to the element type. The size is determined from the number of elements given.

there isn't an all-in-one guide

I refer you to C# 4.0 specification, section 7.6.10.4 "Array Creation Expressions".

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@BoltClock: The first syntax you mention is an "implicitly typed array creation expression". The second is an "anonymous object creation expression". You do not list the other two similar syntaxes; they are "object initializer" and "collection initializer". –  Eric Lippert Apr 15 '11 at 14:48
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Not exactly C# "syntax", but let's not forget (my personal favorite) Array.CreateInstance(typeof(int), 3)! –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 15 '11 at 15:38
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@Jeffrey: If we're going down that road,it starts getting silly. E.g., "1,2,3,4".split(','). –  Brian Apr 15 '11 at 18:00
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Why do some of these require implicit convertability of the array elements to the array type, while others require explicit convertability? –  Joren Apr 15 '11 at 19:36
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Then for multi-dimensional arrays, there exist "nested" notations like new int[,] { { 3, 7 }, { 103, 107 }, { 10003, 10007 }, };, and so on for int[,,], int[,,,], ... –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jun 7 '13 at 14:23
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Enumerable.Repeat(String.Empty, count).ToArray()

Will create array of empty strings repeated 'count' times. In case you want to initialize array with same yet special default element value. Careful with reference types, all elements will refer same object.

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Yes, in var arr1 = Enumerable.Repeat(new object(), 10).ToArray(); you get 10 references to the same object. To create 10 distinct objects, you can use var arr2 = Enumerable.Repeat(/* dummy: */ false, 10).Select(x => new object()).ToArray(); or similar. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jun 10 at 13:28
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int[] array = new int[4]; 
array[0] = 10;
array[1] = 20;
array[2] = 30;

or

string[] week = new string[] {"Sunday","Monday","Tuesday"};

or

string[] array = { "Sunday" , "Monday" };

and in multi dimensional array

    Dim i, j As Integer
    Dim strArr(1, 2) As String

    strArr(0, 0) = "First (0,0)"
    strArr(0, 1) = "Second (0,1)"

    strArr(1, 0) = "Third (1,0)"
    strArr(1, 1) = "Fourth (1,1)"
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