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I'm trying to accomplish a layout like the one below:

enter image description here

Two float:left divs are positioned side by side, each with 45% of the width. On the right, the div contains two subsections - one aligned to the bottom of the div and one aligned to the top.

If the sections on the right get long enough, they will of course meet in the middle and then begin pushing out the height of the containing div:

enter image description here

I've been playing with faux-columns, clear:all, overflow:hidden, bottom:0, and any other tricks I could think of, but I can't get this behaviour to work.

The real problem seems to be stemming from the smaller of the left and right div not expanding to the height of the container, which takes on the height of the larger of the two using overflow:hidden. Any thoughts?

What I have so far:

<div style="overflow:hidden; clear:both">
    <div id="column1" style="float: left; width:45%">
    <div id="column2" style="float: left; width:45%">
        <div style="float: left; top: 0">Content Here should sit up top</div>
        <div style="float: left; bottom: 0">Content Here should sit on bottom</div>
    </div>
</div>

This is how it's turning out, I can't get the top and bottom to separate without using fixed heights somewhere:

enter image description here

Thanks for having a look guys!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I have CSS solution, as JS is not do-able..

Example: here

all "columns" are inline blocks forced not to wrap, that way you can vertically align them all, then the 3rd "column" (bottom right) is slotted into place via a negative margin

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Ooh so close, except that when the sum of the heights of the lists on the right gets larger then the list on the left, the content gets lost, rather than both columns getting higher. I guess that's because of the way the last one is slotted in with a negative margin. –  Alain Apr 15 '11 at 16:01
    
yep. you take it right ;).. I'm looking at it right now, a min height on content might help, are those two right boxes likely to very stable in height or could they be higher than the content? –  clairesuzy Apr 15 '11 at 16:12
    
Both are automatically generated lists of articles that fall into certain categories. I expect the two of them combined to grow at about the same rate as the one on the left, but I also expect each list length to overtake the other from time to time. –  Alain Apr 15 '11 at 16:15
    
OK leave it with me.. off to do something else and hope for a miracle solution hehe.. as others as said this not an easy ask but I need to rack my brain for that missing piece, if there is one ;) bah to IE and it's non-table cell support, and bah to css for not having a grid layout module ready yet! –  clairesuzy Apr 15 '11 at 16:32
    
Even though the combined height of the divs on the right exceeding the height of the div on the left will break the layout, it's so close to the correct answer I'm going to check it off. At least until a fix is found for it. –  Alain May 3 '11 at 16:02

You can drop the floats and give it a try with display:table-cell (and table, table-row...) but that would limit browser support from IE8 and up.

But if you do get it to work like that, you could just use javascript to get IE6 / IE7 to play nice (if you need them to...).

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Unfortunately, huge portion of the wiki users are still using IE6 and IE7, and this is a main index page, so I won't be able to use this advanced feature. Javascript is a no-go on this wiki too. I might have to give up on divs (which break into a single file nicely on the thin screens of mobiles) and go with a plain table layout. –  Alain Apr 15 '11 at 15:46
1  
@Alain If IE6 is a requirement and javascript a no-go, there´s not much that css can do for you I´m afraid. –  jeroen Apr 15 '11 at 15:51

You'll go insane trying to accomplish this with CSS by itself.

If you only need to support modern browsers, you can use display: table which will give you the vertical alignment control of a traditional table.

Otherwise, this is really a job for JS and if you're using something like jQuery, it's fairly trivial to accomplish.

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I've gone insane :) Unfortunately, huge portion of the wiki users are still using IE6 and IE7, and this is a main index page, so I won't be able to use this advanced feature. –  Alain Apr 15 '11 at 15:44
    
That's why I suggested JS. That's the better way to go if you have to deal with IE –  DA. Apr 15 '11 at 18:12

You need to use JavaScript, inside $(document).ready you can set up 3 variables, one for each height. Add an aditional div (lets call this expansor) between the two right ones, and depending on the heights of the other three, change this div (expansor) height.

remember, var dos = $("#one").height(); gives you the height of a div with id ="one"

To change a div height, just use $("#expansor").height(newHeight) ;

Been 'newHeight' the result of the first div height minus the 2 right divs.

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Too bad. I'd be happy with a simple solution like this but I'm producing a page on a wiki where Javascript isn't doable. –  Alain Apr 15 '11 at 15:43
1  
given the constraints of the Wiki, the fact you can't use JavaScript, and that you have to support IE6, I'd strongly suggest redesigning the page layout. Don't fight your constraints. Adapt to them. –  DA. Apr 15 '11 at 18:15

As previously said, you're going to go crazy trying to make this work across the board on all browsers without using a ton of JavaScript.

My solution has been to use a combination of absolute and relative positioning teamed up with a min/max-height scenario. You'll also be using a few more nested DIVs making sure to use dummy "clear:both" DIVs to make sure you properly push things.

Example:

<!-- Clear CSS -->
.clear {
    clear:both;
    height:0;
    line-height:0;
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
    font-size:0;
    border:none;
}
<!-- End CSS -->

<div id="container" style="width:400px;position:relative;">
    <div id="column-right" style="height:300px;width:195px;float:right;">
        <div id="block-top" style="position:absolute;top:0;height:145px;">
            <div class="content">
                ...
            </div>
            <div class="clear">&nbsp;</div>
        </div>
        <div id="block-bottom" style="position:absolute;bottom:0;height:145px;">
            <div class="content">
                ...
            </div>
            <div class="clear">&nbsp;</div>
        </div>
        <div class="clear">&nbsp;</div>
    </div>
    <div id="column-left" style="position:relative;height:300px;width:195px;float:left;">
        <div class="content">
            ...
        </div>
        <div class="clear">&nbsp;</div>
    </div>
    <div class="clear">&nbsp;</div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
I'd be interested in testing such a solution if you're able to put one together. I've tried tons of combinations of nested divs and different positioning, but haven't nailed it yet. –  Alain Apr 15 '11 at 15:47
    
I've added code to my previous reply. :) –  z33k3r Apr 15 '11 at 16:17
    
you wouldn't need a 'ton' of javascript. A few lines of jQuery could handle the logic. –  DA. Apr 15 '11 at 18:14

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