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I'm in the process of coding Huffman Code where I import a file, generate huffman code for each character, then output the binary to a file. To import the characters I am using a scanner that reads each character, puts it in a node that has values of the read character and a frequency of 1. Then, the node is added to a PriorityQueue. Since the Node class has a compareTo method that compares only frequency, how can I implement a comparator to this specific PriorityQueue that compares the characters when sorting in queue? Thanks in advanced.

Literal example: The queue of characters should be sorted as follows:

[A:1][A:1][A:1][B:1][C:1]
Next step:
[A:1][A:2][B:1][C:1]
Final:
[A:3][B:1][C:1]

Here are some snippets:

protected class Node implements Comparable<Node>{
    Character symbol;
    int frequency;

    Node left = null;
    Node right = null;
    @Override
    public int compareTo(Node n) {
        return n.frequency < this.frequency ? 1 : (n.frequency == this.frequency ? 0 : -1);
    }

    public Node(Character c, int f){
        this.symbol = c;
        this.frequency = f;
    }
    public String toString(){
        return "["+this.symbol +","+this.frequency+"]";
    }

This is the PriorityQueue that needs a custom comparator:

public static PriorityQueue<Node> gatherFrequency(String file) throws Exception{
    File f = new File(file);
    Scanner reader = new Scanner(f);
    PriorityQueue<Node> PQ = new PriorityQueue<Node>();
    while(reader.hasNext()){
        for(int i = 0; i < reader.next().length();i++){
            PQ.add(new Node(reader.next().charAt(0),1));
        }
    }
    if(PQ.size()>1){ //during this loop the nodes should be compared by character value
        while(PQ.size() > 1){
            Node a = PQ.remove();
            Node b = PQ.remove();
            if(a.symbol.compareTo(b.symbol)==0){
                Node c = new Node(a.symbol, a.frequency + b.frequency);
                PQ.add(c);
            }
            else break;
        }
        return PQ;
    }
    return PQ;

}

This is the new method I created using a HashMap:

public static Collection<Entry<Character,Integer>> gatherFrequency(String file) throws Exception{
        File f = new File(file);
        Scanner reader = new Scanner(f);
        HashMap<Character, Integer> map = new HashMap<Character, Integer>();
        while(reader.hasNext()){
            for(int i = 0; i < reader.next().length();i++){
                Character key = reader.next().charAt(i);
                if(map.containsKey(reader.next().charAt(i))){
                    int freq = map.get(key);
                    map.put(key, freq+1);
                }
                else{
                    map.put(key, 1);
                }
            }
        }
        return map.entrySet();
    }
share|improve this question
1  
This appear to be far more complicated than it needs to be. Shouldn't all A be counted even if they are not consecutive. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 15 '11 at 15:28
    
They will always be consecutive if they are in a PriorityQueue that sorts by Character value –  Trevor Arjeski Apr 15 '11 at 15:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The standard approach to implementing Huffman trees is to use a hashmap (in Java, you'd probably use a HashMap<Character, Integer>) to count the frequency for each letter, and insert into the priority queue one node for each letter. So when constructing the Huffman tree itself, you start out with a priority queue that is already in the "final" state that you showed. The Huffman algorithm then repeatedly extracts two nodes from the priority queue, constructs a new parent node for those two nodes, and inserts the new node into the priority queue.

share|improve this answer
1  
@TrevorMA: Unless you really need the slight performance improvement offered by TIntIntHashMap, I recommend that you use the standard HashMap, in particular since you haven't used it before (this will be a good opportunity to learn it, and you'll come across HashMap much more often than TIntIntHashMap). –  Aasmund Eldhuset Apr 15 '11 at 16:11
1  
@TrevorMA: True; that can be a little confusing. The put() method is used both to place something in the hashmap for the first time, and also to replace an existing value. Let's say that you have a character stored in the variable c; then you'll first need to check if the hashmap contains c as a key. If it does, you can read the current frequency with get(), compute frequency + 1 and update the frequency in the hashmap with put(). If the key is not there, you can add it with the frequency 1. –  Aasmund Eldhuset Apr 15 '11 at 16:30
1  
@TrevorMA: No problem. Use the entrySet() method, which gives you a collection of map entries, where each entry contains both the key and the value. –  Aasmund Eldhuset Apr 15 '11 at 16:47
1  
@TrevorMA: Glad it helped. By the way, remember to somehow include a description of the Huffman tree in the output file, since the bit sequence that is produced by the algorithm isn't of much use if you don't have the tree... ;-) –  Aasmund Eldhuset Apr 15 '11 at 16:54
1  
@TrevorMA: After doing Character key = reader.next().charAt(i);, you call reader.next() once more, thus reading one more character. That character will likely be different from the one that is now stored in key, and you ask if the second character is present in the dictionary - and if it is, you try to update key. (Edit: I see now that you call next() many times - each call to next gives you the next string from the input... Use next() only once in the entire while loop body.) –  Aasmund Eldhuset Apr 15 '11 at 17:50

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