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I have such an enum and a property.

        public enum Type
        {
            Hourly = 1,
            Salary = 2,
            None = 3
        };


        public string EmployeeType
        {
            get
            {
                string type;
                switch (employeeType)
                {
                    case Type.Hourly:
                        type = "Hourly Employee";
                        break;
                    case Type.Salary:
                        type = "Salary Employee";
                        break;
                    default:
                        type = "None";
                        break;
                }
                return type;
            }

            // **EDIT:**
            // Now I am trying to parse the string as enum Type.
            // But Constructor still waits a string to set EmployeeType.
            set
            {
                employeeType = (Type)Enum.Parse(typeof(Type), value);
            }
        }

This is my class:

public class Employee
{
     private Type employeeType;
}

And I want to create such a constructor:

Employee(Employee.Type type) 
{
      EmployeeType = type;
}

EDIT:

Cannot implicitly convert type 'Payroll.Employee.Type' to 'string'

How should I write the set accessor of the property?

UPDATE:

I wanted the get accessor to return string and set accessor to take parameter type Employee.Type. I learned that it is impossible to do this in a property according to the C# spec. I have to write separate getter and setter methods.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Use DescriptionAttribute instead.

public enum Type
{
    [Description("Hourly Employee")]
    Hourly = 1,
    [Description("Salary Employee")]
    Salary = 2,
    [Description("None")]
    None = 3
};

Then you would just have an

public Type EmployeeType {get; set;}

property. And if somebody wanted to write it out, they could get the description. I'd also call it Type instead of EmployeeType, because the call myEmployee.EmployeeType sounds redundant. Your other option might be to unroll the property and have two methods

public string GetEmployeeType() { //your switch statement }
public void SetEmployeeType(EmployeeType type)
{
    _type = type;
}

Not quite as elegant as a property, but quickly does the job. Also remember that properties in IL are just methods.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there no way just filling the set method without writing any code out of it? –  Timuçin Apr 15 '11 at 16:20
    
I'd recommend against it because then you'd have to do some kind of string parsing to an enum. You don't know if the string will be coming in with the correct format or it will be "Salary Employee". Also what happens if the string coming in isn't part of the enum at all? Using the Enum is closer to a statically typed contract for the user to use. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Apr 15 '11 at 16:26
    
you are right. Your suggestion is a better option. But assume I am trying to parse it like one of the answers below. Why is it still giving "Cannot implicitly convert type 'Employee.Type' to 'string'" error on the constructor? –  Timuçin Apr 15 '11 at 16:30
1  
I think I must make it clear: I want the get accessor to return string. I want the set accessor take parameter type Employee.Type. Isn't it possible? –  Timuçin Apr 15 '11 at 16:44
1  
@Tim that is impossible according to C# Spec. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Apr 15 '11 at 16:46

Like this:

EmployeeType = (Type)Enum.Parse(typeof(Type), value);
share|improve this answer
    
+1: This is where my thinking took me. I just didn't use the generic method. –  Joel Etherton Apr 15 '11 at 16:02
    
Its giving this error: The non-generic method 'System.Enum.Parse(System.Type, string, bool)' cannot be used with type arguments –  Timuçin Apr 15 '11 at 16:04
    
@Joel Sorry it's not generic, it was a typo –  w69rdy Apr 15 '11 at 16:04
    
Oh, I didn't know it didn't allow a generic. Man, that would be great. Note to Microsoft: Make a generic extension for Parse. –  Joel Etherton Apr 15 '11 at 16:06

I recommend you don't use the word type, and you need to parse the enum:

set
{
    employeeType = (Type)Enum.Parse(typeof(Type), value);
}

Edit:

First, I can't reiterate enough not to use the word Type for either the enum OR the string for returning the property. Second, the usage of enums here with switch could land you in trouble, but the default may bail you out.

public enum WorkType
{
    Hourly = 1,
    Salary = 2,
    None = 3
};

// Initialize this to prevent craziness
private WorkType employeeType = WorkType.None;
public string EmployeeType
{
    get
    {
        // I'm not sure why you want to return a string
        // in this property but whatevs.
        // First make sure that you have a valid enum
        if ((int)employeeType > 3 || (int)employeeType < 1)
            employeeType = WorkType.None;
        return employeeType.ToString();   // Don't need a switch, just call ToString()
        }

        set
        {
            // This might be better served with a TryParse. This will
            // be more fault tolerant if someone using your class passes
            // in an invalid WorkType.
            if(!TryParse(typeof(WorkType), value, out employeeType))
                employeeType = WorkType.None;
        }
    }
}

I suspect the problem you're running into with the conversion is that you're using an assignment that is not a string like:

WorkType someType = WorkType.None;
this.EmployeeType = someType;   // Exception is here

This is an invalid case because someType is a type and EmployeeType (value) is a string. To fix this you need to assign it with:

this.EmployeeType = someType.ToString();

All of this sort of boils down to pretty silly because it can be accomplished with something as simple as:

public enum WorkType
{
    Hourly = 1,
    Salary = 2,
    None = 3
};

public WorkType EmployeeType { get; set; }
// Any time you want to access the value of EmployeeType as a string you would
// simply use the following line:
// EmployeeType.ToString();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for recommending not using the word Type, although your solution does assume the string being parsed is the same as the enum name which it isn't in the example: Hourly vs. Hourly Employee. –  Rob Levine Apr 15 '11 at 16:03
    
Its giving this error on the constructor:Cannot implicitly convert type 'Employee.Type' to 'string' –  Timuçin Apr 15 '11 at 16:03
    
@Tim: then your definition of employeeType must not be set to Employee.Type. Somewhere you have a clashing type. Can you provide an edit that includes where you are declaring the variable employeeType? –  Joel Etherton Apr 15 '11 at 16:05
    
No, its Employee.Type and still getting this error. –  Timuçin Apr 15 '11 at 16:15
    
@Tim: I've noticed a couple of other things so I will post an edit. –  Joel Etherton Apr 15 '11 at 16:25

Ideally you should still have a private member you can set/get that the property can attach to. From there, you can make another method to get the "Human Readable/Formatted" version. e.g.

public enum EmployeeType
{
  Hourly = 1,
  Salary = 2,
  None = 3
}

private EmployeeType _EmployeeType;

public EmployeeType EmployeeType
{
  get { return this._EmployeeType; }
  set { this._EmployeeType = value; }
}

Then you have a method to return the formatted version

public String EmployeeType()
{
  switch (this._EmployeeType)
  {
    case EmployeeType.Hourly:
      return "Hourly Employee";
    case EmployeeType.Salary:
      return "Salary Employee";
    default:
      return "None";
  }
}

or that's how I would do it. Otherwise, an enum doesn't make sense and you should just work with a string and validate the input/output to fall within pre-selected valid values.

EDIT I recommend this just because a string input and trying to align it with the name of an enum (as others have suggested) just appears flawed to me. Especially with the transition of "Hourly" to "Hourly Employee". (obj).EmployeeType = "Hourly Employee" won't work with using Enum.Parse because there is no valid enum matching the input.

EDITv2 I actually like @Yuriy's use of the DescriptionAttribute better. Keep it type-structured, but make it legible when printed.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there no way to do this just in the set method? –  Timuçin Apr 15 '11 at 16:22
    
@Tim: The point of an enum to to alleviate using "hard strings" for values. You can parse the value and look for a set of pre-defined values and set your employeeType variable but this seems convoluted as compared to just referencing enum values. –  Brad Christie Apr 15 '11 at 17:05

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