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This algorithm looks through a string and tries to find another string. The logic is simple, I guess. Though, I need help finding it's complexity.

int find(string mString, string lookUp)
{
    int i, z, j, m = mString.size(), n = lookUp.size(), broken = 0, st = 0;
    for(j = 0, i = 0; i < m; i++)
    {
        if(mString[i] == lookUp[j])
        {
            if(broken)
            {
                //go back and see if we're on the good path
                broken = 0;
                for(z = 0; z < j; z++)
                {
                    if(broken) break;
                    if(mString[i-z] == lookUp[j-z])
                        broken = 0;
                    else
                        broken = 1;
                }
                if(!broken) st = i - j + 1;
            }
            if(j + 1 != n)
                j++;
        }
        else
            broken = 1;
    }
    return st;
}

Can somebody please help me?

Thank you.

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1  
what do you have so far? –  Femaref Apr 15 '11 at 18:15
    
Well, for now I think the worst case is O(m * n), though it might be just O((m-n) * n). I am just confuse. –  Guluto Apr 15 '11 at 18:21
    
You forgot about the for loop with z. –  Femaref Apr 15 '11 at 18:22
    
That's why I am confuse...though if I think twice, O(m*n + n), that should be the worst case. What's your opinion? –  Guluto Apr 15 '11 at 18:26
    
Why are you confused? What is unclear? (I'm asking because, if you can pin point what confuses you, we can help you more.) –  Davidann Apr 15 '11 at 18:33

2 Answers 2

When dealing with big-O and loops, I ask myself the question:

How many times, at most, can each loop run?

In your example,

  1. The outer loop will run, at most, `m` times.
  2. The inner loop will run, at most, `n` times.
  3. For each iteration of the outer loop, the inner loop will run, at most, `n` times

Does this help clarify your thinking?

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Yes, thank you. –  Guluto Apr 15 '11 at 18:44

O(n^2) is the final complexity of this algorithm.

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