Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to remove all special characters from a string. Allowed characters are A-Z (uppercase or lowercase), numbers (0-9), underscore (_), white space ( ), pecentage(%) or the dot sign (.).

I have tried this:

        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        foreach (char c in input)
        {
            if ((c >= '0' && c <= '9') || (c >= 'A' && c <= 'Z') || (c >= 'a' && c <= 'z') | c == '.' || c == '_' || c == ' ' || c == '%')
            { sb.Append(c); }
        }
        return sb.ToString();

And this:

        Regex r = new Regex("(?:[^a-z0-9% ]|(?<=['\"])s)", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase | RegexOptions.CultureInvariant | RegexOptions.Compiled); 
        return r.Replace(input, String.Empty); 

But nothing seems to be working. Any help will be appreciated.

Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
Have you looked at this thread on StackOverflow? This guy has a working implementation that you seem to want. –  Tejs Apr 15 '11 at 18:19
1  
Is this a type? "'z') | c == '.' ||"? –  Matt Dawdy Apr 15 '11 at 18:19
    
Thank you so much for all the responses. All of them worked for me. I just realized that I forgot to re-publish and that was causing the issue that it was elmenating the white spaces too. –  OBL Apr 15 '11 at 18:50
    
@Matt Dawdy: I think it is a typo - and so is "type" :p –  Aasmund Eldhuset Apr 15 '11 at 19:03
    
@Aasmund Eldhuset -- that's freaking funny. At least I wasn't rude about it! :) –  Matt Dawdy Apr 17 '11 at 2:56

7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can simplify the first method to

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
foreach (char c in input)
{
    if (Char.IsLetterOrDigit(c) || c == '.' || c == '_' || c == ' ' || c == '%')
    { sb.Append(c); }
}
return sb.ToString();

which seems to pass simple tests. You can shorten it using LINQ

return new string(
    input.Where(
        c => Char.IsLetterOrDigit(c) || 
            c == '.' || c == '_' || c == ' ' || c == '%')
    .ToArray());
share|improve this answer
9  
Be careful with Char.IsLetterOrDigit, since it considers all Unicode letters and digits. So Char.IsLetterOrDigit('Ѝ') returns true, because that's a letter in the Cyrillic alphabet. –  Jim Mischel Apr 15 '11 at 20:38
Regex.Replace(input, "[^a-zA-Z0-9% ._]", string.Empty)
share|improve this answer
10  
This really is the easiest and most appropriate solution. –  Jim Mischel Apr 15 '11 at 20:44
    
Simply the best –  Richard Bos Mar 5 '14 at 15:48

The first approach seems correct, except that you have a | (bitwise OR) instead of a || before c == '.'.

By the way, you should state what doesn't work (doesn't it compile, or does it crash, or does it produce wrong output?)

share|improve this answer
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
foreach (char c in input)
{
    if (char.IsLetterOrDigit(c) || "_ %.".Contains(c.ToString()))
        sb.Append(c);
}
return sb.ToString();
share|improve this answer

This is how my version might look.

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
foreach (char c in input)
{
    if (Char.IsLetterOrDigit(c) ||
        c == '.' || c == '_' || c == ' ' || c == '%')
        sb.Append(c);
    }
}
return sb.ToString();
share|improve this answer
    
IsLetterOrDigit allows all Unicode letters and digits. For example, calling it with 'Ѝ' will return true. –  Jim Mischel Apr 15 '11 at 20:40
    
@Jim: Yes, I understand that. But while the original question only checked for English alphabet characters, it also didn't address the issue of international characters. It seemed quite possible that Char.IsLetterOrDigit() would meet the OP's requirements. –  Jonathan Wood Apr 15 '11 at 22:46
private string RemoveReservedCharacters(string strValue)
{
    char[] ReservedChars = {'/', ':','*','?','"', '<', '>', '|'};

    foreach (char strChar in ReservedChars)
    {
        strValue = strValue.Replace(strChar.ToString(), "");
    }
    return strValue;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Acceptable solution because of its simplicity. Performance is not that great, because it creates a new string for each replaced character. Why are the ReservedChars not a string[]? Then you wouldn't need to call ToString each time. –  Stefan Steinegger Oct 2 '12 at 9:38

Cast each char to an int, then compare its ascii code to the ascii table, which you can find all over the internet: http://www.asciitable.com/

    {
        char[] input = txtInput.Text.ToCharArray();
        StringBuilder sbResult = new StringBuilder();

        foreach (char c in input)
        {
            int asciiCode = (int)c;
            if (
                //Space
                asciiCode == 32
                ||
                // Period (.)
                asciiCode == 46
                ||
                // Percentage Sign (%)
                asciiCode == 37
                ||
                // Underscore
                asciiCode == 95
                ||
                ( //0-9, 
                    asciiCode >= 48
                    && asciiCode <= 57
                )
                ||
                ( //A-Z
                    asciiCode >= 65
                    && asciiCode <= 90
                )
                ||
                ( //a-z
                    asciiCode >= 97
                    && asciiCode <= 122
                )
            )
            {
                sbResult.Append(c);
            }
        }

        txtResult.Text = sbResult.ToString();
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.