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Here is my problem,

Not using prepared statements I can do it just fine, for example,

    $qry = "SELECT * FROM accounts WHERE email = '$email'";
$result = mysql_query($qry);
$account = mysql_fetch_assoc($result);
echo '<p>Welcome <strong>' . $account['username'] . '</strong>, Have a good day! And dont forgot your id ' . $account['id'] . '.</p>';

Considering an email does match a row on the mysql database, then I can with ease echo any other column where the email matches by simply doing $account['gender'], $account['age'] for example.

I am having alot of trouble doing it OO, here is my attempt;

$q = $dbc -> prepare ("SELECT * FROM accounts WHERE email = ?");
$q -> bind_param ('s', $email);
$q -> execute();
$q -> bind_result();
$info = $q -> fetch();
echo '<p>Welcome ' . $info['username'] . '.</p>';

Doing it with the first method I can display any information from any column where the email matches for that row, I switched to prepared statements for security, but I am thinking of switching back with the hassle it is causing!

share|improve this question
    
If you're switching to OO, use PDO rather than Mysqli. –  Kalessin Apr 15 '11 at 18:20
    
And what is your problem? You just say that you have a lot of trouble... but you are not telling us what is happening. –  Felix Kling Apr 15 '11 at 18:24
    
I cannot get it to echo any column information at all, I have a database where each row has around 300 columns, naming each of them in the query instead of using *, is too much of a hassle. –  Basic Apr 15 '11 at 18:25
    
@Kalessin why would you use PDO? –  Basic Apr 15 '11 at 18:28
1  
@Basic: PDO has many advantages over Mysqli, including portability (it can be used with database engines other than MySQL), named placeholders ($dbc->prepare("SELECT * FROM accounts WHERE email = ?") versus $dbc -> prepare ("SELECT * FROM accounts WHERE email = :email")) and returning data as an object, as well as numeric and associative arrays. –  Kalessin Apr 15 '11 at 18:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

bind_result takes parameters. You pass it the variables you want it to set, then you call fetch.

$q->bind_result($username);
$q->fetch();
echo $username;

For this to work, you need to change SELECT * to the fields you want, ie SELECT username.

If you still need to use SELECT *, you can do this:

$q->execute();
$r = $q->get_result();
while($row = $r->fetch_array(MYSQLI_ASSOC)){
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok thanks, I will try this. –  Basic Apr 15 '11 at 18:27

Good old MySQL extension does not support prepared statements so you must have switched to another extension you don't mention. If it happens to be mysqli, you're out of luck: it only supports associative arrays when you don't use prepared statements.

My advise is to try out PDO. The MySQL driver is stable and it has a great API you can reuse for other DBMS engines.

share|improve this answer
    
Ye mysqli is what I am using, if it doesn't support associative arrays then it is useless to me, PDO it is then, I just wasted my whole day trying to get that to work! Thanks. –  Basic Apr 15 '11 at 18:43

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