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I have a query which is being executed via LINQ to SQL. The query looks like this:

exec sp_executesql N'
SELECT DISTINCT [t2].[ID],...
FROM 
    Table1 AS [t0]
    INNER JOIN Table2 AS [t1] ON [t0].[Table1ID] = [t1].[Table1ID]
    INNER JOIN Table3 AS [t2] ON [t2].[Table2ID] = [t0].[Table2ID]
WHERE 
    ([t2].[Visible] = @p0) 
    AND ([t1].[AncestorID] IN (@p1,...,@p277))',N'@p0 int,...,@p277 int',@p0=1,...@p277=2875

As you can see it is basically an in-clause query with 277 parameters. Using exec and passing the parameters as above, the query takes 20 seconds.

If I pull the query out of the exec call and run it "normally" it takes less than one second. Here is the query:

DECLARE @p0 int;
...
DECLARE @p277 int;

SET @p0=1;
...
SET @p277=287;

SELECT DISTINCT [t2].[ID],...
    FROM 
        Table1 AS [t0]
        INNER JOIN Table2 AS [t1] ON [t0].[Table1ID] = [t1].[Table1ID]
        INNER JOIN Table3 AS [t2] ON [t2].[Table2ID] = [t0].[Table2ID]
    WHERE 
        ([t2].[Visible] = @p0) 
        AND ([t1].[AncestorID] IN (@p1,...,@p277))

The third test, when I wrap the second query inside an exec, it works instantly still. So the problem seems to be with passing the parameters along in the exec call.

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I'm guessing the (implied) question is, "How do I make this run faster?" –  JNK Apr 15 '11 at 18:28
    
How does this relate to LINQ? –  Jeff Mercado Apr 15 '11 at 18:42
    
The first query is what LINQ-to-SQL produces. And the question is "why are these queries, which are the same at the core, running at different speeds." –  Josh M. Apr 15 '11 at 18:52
    
@Josh M. - Did you try running it twice in a row through sp_executesql? you could be seeing the effects of caching, and the first run did all the work pulling the data pages and creating the exec plan. –  JNK Apr 15 '11 at 19:14
1  
@Josh - Have you checked the execution plan? –  JNK Apr 15 '11 at 19:39

2 Answers 2

So the problem seems to be with passing the parameters along in the exec call.

I think that you for some reason have different execution plans.

Here is an article by Erland Sommarskog that could be helpful for you to figure out what is going on.

Slow in the Application, Fast in SSMS? Understanding Performance Mysteries

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The issue likely has to do with "Parameter Sniffing" and the article linked by @Mikael talks about that. Unfortunately, this is one of the main down-sides to using an ORM as you lose the ability to tweak the SQL for performance.

Here are some things to try:

  1. Run DBCC FREEPROCCACHE and run the query from the app again to see if that has any difference. Running it multiple times will not get a new execution plan because it is already cached from the first run.
  2. Be sure to rebuild the indexes on the Tables to make sure that the statistics are up to date (a rebuild, not defrag should automatically update the stats)
  3. If need be, you can always convert this operation to a Stored Procedure and call that from LINQ-to-SQL. You just might then have to pass in the list of values as a comma- separated list or XML. If you are on SQL Server 2008 (or newer) the best solution would be to construct a DataTable on the app side and pass that into the Proc as a Table-Valued Parameter and use that in an INNER JOIN instead of an IN list.

Also, your second and third tests are basically the same as Ad Hoc queries have their plans cached with a key based on the EXACT text of the query, including spaces, etc. So wrapping it in an EXEC really shouldn't change how the optimizer sees it.

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