Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is this a fair analogy to make? I think I can think of some scenarios where you have to use locks, but I'm not sure if they're necessary.

For instance, here is a loop I recently wrote to perform waiting on a thread to update a list. I apologize if this is terrible java, as I am a native linux kernel-ite:

ReentrantLock lock;

...

while(true) {
    lock.lock();
    int size = queue.size();

    if (size == 0) {
        try {
            lock.unlock();

            Thread.sleep(3600000);
            continue;
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            lock.lock();
            size = queue.size();
            if (size == 0) {
                lock.unlock();
                continue;
            }
        }
    }

    VPacket p = queue.getFirst();
    lock.unlock();

    return p;
}

Where VPacket is a packet for the particular protocol I'm writing.

This analogy came to mind as I pondered the Collections.synchonizedList class, thinking about how I can do this without such C-like tricks.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Brian Roach, musiKk, David Heffernan, dmckee, John Saunders Apr 15 '11 at 20:31

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
In structured programming gotos are useful. Locks can be useful in synchronized programming, but not the best option, generally. So, it is a tool, whether it is the best one is up to the programmer. So, if your question whether locks are a valid tool, then yes, but are the critical then I would disagree. I think your question is poorly worded, as I am not certain what you are looking for. –  James Black Apr 15 '11 at 19:03
1  
goto is used all the time to break out of blocks, e.g. break. Exceptions are just posh gotos. –  David Heffernan Apr 15 '11 at 19:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, synchronized blocks predate classes like ReentrantLock by many years; the classes in that package were introduced to provide some more sophisticated and higher-level capabilities than what Java the language had previously offered -- although many of those capabilities are needed only in very specific circumstances.

But in this specific case, I would say that using a synchronized block (and wait(N) instead of sleep(N)!) would be more elegant. I understand your analogy, and I'd say that sometimes it holds; certainly for this sort of run-of-the-mill-case, using a synchronized block is like using the RAII pattern in C++ -- it's the clearest way to make sure things are cleaned up when needed.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the important note about waiting rather than sleeping. –  Laurent Pireyn Apr 15 '11 at 19:15
    
what specific services does wait provide? –  Alex Apr 15 '11 at 19:19
    
@Alex: wait() is very much like the unlock/sleep combo you already have there, except it's atomic, and it has the added bonus that you can't "wake up" without reacquiring the lock. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Apr 15 '11 at 19:47
    
... and whereas sleep() can only be interrupted using interrupt(), which results in an exception being thrown, wait() can be signaled with notify(). Much cleaner. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Apr 15 '11 at 20:02

In general, designing concurrent data structures that behave (and perform) well is a very tricky task. It is considered a Good Thing(tm) if you don't implement everything yourself using low-level tools, but rather use more high-level abstractions available in the standard library.

For your task, I'd rather use a BlockingQueue or BlockingDeque which takes care of the synchronization for me.

share|improve this answer
    
My only problem with using the blocking structures is that I need to perform checking of the size and extraction atomically. This leads to a race if I don't have some way to guarantee that nothing will be interleaved between the two operations. –  Alex Apr 16 '11 at 18:53

Synchronized blocks are always properly nested by nature, while you can misuse locks and forget to unlock. However, the first thing you read about locks is to always use them in a try/finally construct, like this:

lock.lock();
try {
    // Do things...
}
finally {
    lock.unlock();
}

This is a strongly recommended pattern that ensures your locks behave as synchronized blocks.

Locks have several advantages over synchronized blocks:

  • They are more efficient than synchronized blocks, although I read that's been fixed in the recent JVM.
  • Some locks can be split into read and write locks for increased concurrency.
  • They can be passed around, but then you're out of the safe pattern explained above.

So, IMHO, locks are more like a bigger gun: more powerful, but also more dangerous if you don't know how to use them.

share|improve this answer

A modified version of the same code, which more optimal IMO :) To answer you question, the analogy is wrong. gotos received a bad reputation because of the way they allowed control flows to escape, causing nightmares. Locks do not allow control to escape in the same sense. Well, you may ask what happens if I acquire a lock and refuse to release it. Not possible with sync blocks. The ideal pattern is to use a try-finally. BTW, concurrent programming is itself a nightmare which cannot be enhanced/reduced.

while(true) {
    if(queue.size()==0){
        Thread.sleep(36000);
    }
    lock.lock();
    Vpacket p = null;
    try {
         p = null;
         if(queue.size()!=0) {
              p = queue.pop();
         }
    } finally {
         lock.unlock();
         if(p!=null) {
              return p;
         }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
checking the queue size outside the lock is most likely not thread safe. –  jtahlborn Apr 15 '11 at 19:30
    
Aaha! expecting someone to read that. What does the original code do, synchronize access on the queue? No. The queue itself is mutable, I have not reduced any thread safety, just added an optimization for unsync sleep(). To achieve safe queue.size() you have to lock it on the queue object itself –  questzen Apr 15 '11 at 19:46
    
sorry, that's not correct. the original code has lock calls around all the queue accesses, so it is thread-safe. –  jtahlborn Apr 16 '11 at 13:49
    
Umm, still disagree with you :) We actually don't see queue being populated in this snippet, do we? As the queue is declared as an instance variable, for all we know it might be updated by a different Thread. Without the complete code being posted neither of us would be entirely correct! –  questzen Apr 18 '11 at 3:35
    
Also there is an additional element of stale state which has to be addressed, if the queue is shared across objects. Just using locks in a function block is not entirely sufficient. –  questzen Apr 18 '11 at 3:37

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.