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I'm just learning C# and working with some examples of strings and StringBuilder. From my reading, I understand that if I do this:

string greeting = "Hello";
greeting += " my good friends";

that I get a new string called greeting with the concatenated value. I understand that the run-time(or compiler, or whatever) is actually getting rid of the reference to the original string greeting and replacing it with a new concatenated one of the same name.

I was just wondering what practical application/ramification this has. Why does it matter to me how C# shuffles strings around in the background when the effect to me is simply that my initial variable changed value.

I was wondering if someone could give me a scenario where a programmer would need to know the difference. * a simple example would be nice, as I'm a relative beginner to this.

Thanks in advance..

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What did your websearch reveal? There must have been something of use turned up by your search. –  David Heffernan Apr 15 '11 at 19:30
    
Very good article: yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/stringbuilder.html –  TBohnen.jnr Apr 15 '11 at 19:35

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I understand that the run-time(or compiler, or whatever) is actually getting rid of the reference to the original string greeting and replacing it with a new concatenated one of the same name.

Pedantic intro: No. Objects do not have names -- variables do. It is storing a new object in the same variable. Thus, the name (variable) used to access the object is the same, even though it (the variable) now refers to another object. An object may also be stored in multiple variables and have multiple "names" at the same time or it might not be accessible directly by any variable.

The other parts of the question have already been succinctly answered for the case of strings -- however, the mutable/immutable ramifications are much larger. Here are some questions which may widen the scope of the issue in context.

  1. What happens if you set a property of an object passed into a method? (There are these pesky "value-types" in C#, so it depends...)
  2. What happens if a sequence of actions leaves an object in an inconsistent state? (E.g. property A was set and an error occurred before property B was set?)
  3. What happens if multiple parts of code expect to be modifying the same object, but are not because the object was cloned/duplicated somewhere?
  4. What happens if multiple parts of code do not expect the object to be modified elsewhere, but it is? (This applies in both threading and non-threading situations)

In general, the contract of an object (API and usage patterns/scope/limitations) must be known and correctly adhered to in order to ensure program validity. I generally find that immutable objects make life easier (as then only one of the above "issues" -- a meager 25% -- even applies).

Happy coding.

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And of course not all variables have names. Only fields and locals have names. What is the name of myArray[10], or *myPointer? –  Eric Lippert Apr 16 '11 at 14:57

C# isn't doing any "shuffling", you are! Your statement assigns a new value to the variable, the referenced object itself did not change, you just dropped the reference.

The major reason immutability is useful is this:

String greeting = "Hello";
// who knows what foo does
foo(greeting);
// always prints "Hello" since String is immutable
System.Console.WriteLine(greeting);

You can share references to immutable objects without worrying about other code changing the object--it can't happen. Therefore immutable objects are easier to reason about.

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In performance terms, the advantage of immutuable is copying an object is cheap in terms of both CPU and memory since it only involves making a copy of a pointer. The downside is that writing to the object becomes more expensive since it must make a copy of the object in the process.

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I think the main benefit of immutable strings lies in make memory management easier.

C# allocates memory byte by byte for each object. If you create a string "Tom" it takes up three bytes. You may then allocate an integer and that would be four bytes. If you then tried to change the string "Tom" to "Tomas" it would require moving all the other memory to make room for the two new characters a and s.

To eliminate this pain, it's easier (and quicker) to just allocate five new bytes for the string "Tomas".

Does that help?

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Most of the time, very little effect. However, in the situation of concatenating many strings, the performance hit of garbage collecting all those strings becomes problematic. Do too many string manipulations with just a string, and the performance of your application can take a nosedive.

This is the reason why StringBuilder is more effective when you have a lot of string manipulation to do; leaving all those 'orphaned' strings out there makes a bigger problem for the Garbage Collector than simply modifying an in memory buffer.

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Strings, again, are a good example. A very common error is:

 string greeting = "Hello Foo!";
 greeting.Replace("Foo", "World");

Instead of the proper:

 string greeting = "Hello Foo!";
 greeting = greeting.Replace("Foo", "World");

Unless you knew that string was an immutable class, you could suspect the first method would be appropriate.

Why does it matter to me how C# shuffles strings around in the background when the effect to me is simply that my initial variable changed value.

The other major place where this has huge advantages is when concurrency is introduced. Immutable types are much easier to deal with in a concurrent situation, as you don't have to worry about whether another thread is modifying the same value within the same reference. Using an immutable type often allows you to avoid the potentially significant cost of synchronization (ie: locking).

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