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Which is standard compliant between these two ?

<p>Text text text ... 
    <ol>
        <li>First element</li>
    </ol>
</p>
<p>
    Other text text ...
</p>

OR

<p>
    Text text text ... 
</p>
<ol>
    <li>First element</li>
</ol>
<p>
    Other text text ...
</p>
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2  
In what context? –  Oded Apr 15 '11 at 19:35
12  
@oded: does the context matters? –  dynamic Apr 15 '11 at 19:43
    
possible duplicate of: stackoverflow.com/questions/4967976/… (unflagged): any decent answer to that will answer how to read the HTML spec and thus also answer this. –  Ciro Santilli 六四事件 法轮功 Jun 17 '14 at 15:52

5 Answers 5

up vote 156 down vote accepted

The short answer is that ol elements are not legally allowed inside `p' elements.

To see why, let's go to the spec! If you can get comfortable with the HTML spec, it will answer many of your questions and curiosities. You want to know if an ol can live inside a p. So…

4.5.1 The p element:

Categories: Flow content, Palpable content.
Content model: Phrasing content.


4.5.5 The ol element:

Categories: Flow content.
Content model: Zero or more li and script-supporting elements.

The first part says that p elements can only contain phrasing content (which are “inline” elements like span and strong).

The second part says ols are flow content (“block” elements like p and div). So they can't be used inside a p.


ols and other flow content can be used in in some other elements like div:

4.5.13 The div element:

Categories: Flow content, Palpable content.
Content model: Flow content.

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38  
this HTML Specs are just awful to read –  dynamic Apr 16 '11 at 12:13
5  
@link: Yes, w3.org is a tad bit technical. Still, there's no doubt about what's correct when and if you've understood them. –  nyson Mar 12 '13 at 10:14
4  
I think @Sid explaining the spec and some of its terms is definitely helpful. If he went a bit further it would a great answer. He could also explicitly answer the question :). I added an edit for that. –  studgeek Mar 26 '13 at 23:06
    
awful to read? don't think so, go to 4.4.1 The p element, the author even talk about fantastic sentences or something like that –  Jaime Hablutzel Apr 5 '14 at 5:27

The second. The first is invalid.

  • A paragraph cannot contain a list.
  • A list cannot contain a paragraph unless that paragraph is contained entirely within a single list item.

A browser will handle it like so:

<p>tetxtextextete 
<!-- Start of paragraph -->
<ol>
<!-- Start of ordered list. Paragraphs cannot contain lists. Insert </p> -->
<li>first element</li></ol>
<!-- A list item element. End of list -->
</p>
<!-- End of paragraph, but not inside paragraph, discard this tag to recover from the error -->
<p>other textetxet</p>
<!-- Another paragraph -->
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4  
No, I didn't. The first example is not HTML. Since the second is HTML it is automatically better. –  Quentin Apr 15 '11 at 19:38
2  
@yes123 How did he misunderstand? I read your question the same way. –  Sidnicious Apr 15 '11 at 19:39
1  
Please cite your sources. I know these rules, but I have yet to see them officially written anywhere. –  chharvey Dec 9 '11 at 22:11
    
w3.org/TR/html4/sgml/dtd.html –  Quentin Dec 9 '11 at 22:12

GO here http://validator.w3.org/ upload your html file and it will tell you what is valid and what is not.

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actually you should only put in-line elements inside the p, so in your case ol is better outside

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2  
This is the same reply as @David Dorward's reply, which you didn't like. –  ceejayoz Apr 15 '11 at 19:39
<p>tetxetextex</p>
<ol><li>first element</li></ol>
<p>other textetxeettx</p>

Because both <p> and <ol> are element rendered as block.

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