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I am trying to merge two xmls in Java. I am using STaX API to write these XMLs. I searched a lot on internet on how to merge xmls but none seems as straight forward as C#. Is there any straight-forward way of doing this in Java using StAX? Probably xslt would not be the right solution since the file size can be big.

File1.xml

<TestCaseBlock>
    <TestCase TestCaseID="1">
        <Step ExecutionTime="2011-03-29 12:08:31 EST">
            <Status>Passed</Status>
            <Description>foo</Description>
            <Expected>foo should pass</Expected>
            <Actual>foo passed</Actual>
        </Step>
       </TestCase>
</TestCaseBlock> 

File2.xml

<TestCaseBlock>
    <TestCase TestCaseID="2">
        <Step ExecutionTime="2011-03-29 12:08:32 EST">
            <Status>Failed</Status>
            <Description>test something</Description>
            <Expected>something expected</Expected>
            <Actual>not as expected</Actual>
        </Step>
    </TestCase>
</TestCaseBlock>

Merged.xml

<TestCaseBlock>
<TestCase TestCaseID="1">
    <Step ExecutionTime="2011-03-29 12:08:33 EST">
        <Status>Passed</Status>
        <Description>foo</Description>
        <Expected>foo should pass</Expected>
        <Actual>foo passed</Actual>
    </Step>
</TestCase>
<TestCase TestCaseID="2">
    <Step ExecutionTime="2011-03-29 12:08:34 EST">
        <Status>Failed</Status>
        <Description>test something</Description>
        <Expected>something expected</Expected>
        <Actual>not as expected</Actual>
    </Step>
</TestCase>
</TestCaseBlock>
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4 Answers 4

General solution still would be XSLT, but you'd need to combine two files into one big XML first with a wrapper element (XSLT works with one input source).

<root>
    <TestCaseBlock>
        <TestCase TestCaseID="1">
        ...
        </TestCase>
    </TestCaseBlock>
    <TestCaseBlock>
        <TestCase TestCaseID="2">
        ...
        </TestCase>
    </TestCaseBlock>
</root>

Then just do XSLT for match="//TestCase", and dump all test cases out, ignoring what test case block they belong to.

And don't worry about performance until you have tried. XML APIs in JAva are getting much better than in 2003.

This is stylesheet you need:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

    <xsl:output method="xml" encoding="UTF-8" indent="yes"/>

    <xsl:template match="/">
            <TestCaseBlock>
                <xsl:apply-templates/>
            </TestCaseBlock>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="//TestCase">
          <xsl:copy-of select="."/> 
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Tested, it works.

BTW, this XSLT was compiled and executed on this (small) example in 1ms.

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Hi, thanks for the reply. I still would need TestCaseBlock though. It is common for all test cases, so I could probably remove it from individual xmls and keep it as a wrapper element. How would I combine two xml files into one file with wrapper element TestCaseBlock? Thanks again –  nilesh Apr 15 '11 at 20:16
    
I have a solution that works for me. I basically built on top of your idea. I used TestCaseBlock as a wrapper element and used XMLEventReader to dump test case tags. Stackoverflow isn't allowing me to answer my own question before 24 hrs :) I will post my code tomorrow for experts to review and suggest. –  nilesh Apr 15 '11 at 21:42
    
You don't need to read original TestCaseBlock. Create you own :) –  Vladimir Dyuzhev Apr 16 '11 at 2:35
    
As long as your solution works for you, experts will be happy! :D –  Vladimir Dyuzhev Apr 16 '11 at 2:53
    
Thanks for the xslt. I am going to save it :) –  nilesh Apr 17 '11 at 23:59
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If structure is regular enough so you can use data binding, I would actually consider binding XML from both files into objects using JAXB, then merging objects, serializing back as XML. If file sizes are big you can also just bind sub-trees; for this you use XMLStreamReader (from Stax api, javax.xml.stream) to iterate to element that is the root, bind that element (and its children) to object you want, iterate to next root element.

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Hi, I think that is an interesting approach. I will search on JAXB.Do you have a quick example? Could you please take a look at my solution and suggest if my approach isn't correct? Thanks. –  nilesh Apr 17 '11 at 23:59
1  
Your solution looks correct to me in general. Just remember to close input reader. As to JAXB, online tutorials should work fine; you just create bean type with setters, getters, create context, marshaller/unmarshaller and so on. –  StaxMan Apr 18 '11 at 21:30
    
Yeah, I need to close the input reader. Thanks for pointing out:) –  nilesh Apr 18 '11 at 23:24
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have a solution that works for me. Now experts, please advise if this is the way to go.

Thanks, -Nilesh

 XMLEventWriter eventWriter;
    XMLEventFactory eventFactory;
    XMLOutputFactory outputFactory = XMLOutputFactory.newInstance();
    eventWriter = outputFactory.createXMLEventWriter(new FileOutputStream("testMerge1.xml"));
    eventFactory = XMLEventFactory.newInstance();
    XMLEvent newLine = eventFactory.createDTD("\n");                
    // Create and write Start Tag
    StartDocument startDocument = eventFactory.createStartDocument();
    eventWriter.add(startDocument);
    eventWriter.add(newLine);
    StartElement configStartElement = eventFactory.createStartElement("","","TestCaseBlock");
    eventWriter.add(configStartElement);
    eventWriter.add(newLine);
    String[] filenames = new String[]{"test1.xml", "test2.xml","test3.xml"};
    for(String filename:filenames){
           XMLEventReader test = inputFactory.createXMLEventReader(filename,
                             new FileInputStream(filename));
        while(test.hasNext()){
            XMLEvent event= test.nextEvent();
        //avoiding start(<?xml version="1.0"?>) and end of the documents;
        if (event.getEventType()!= XMLEvent.START_DOCUMENT && event.getEventType() != XMLEvent.END_DOCUMENT)
                eventWriter.add(event);         
        eventWriter.add(newLine);
            test.close();
        }           
    eventWriter.add(eventFactory.createEndElement("", "", "TestCaseBlock"));
    eventWriter.add(newLine);
    eventWriter.add(eventFactory.createEndDocument());
    eventWriter.close();
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I think XSLT and SAX could be a solution.

If you'll work with Stream that STaX is solution, I read Sun tutorial, I think is very helpful: Sun Tutorail on STaX

Bye

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Hi, thanks for the link. I will check it out. –  nilesh Apr 15 '11 at 20:16
1  
And if you decide to use Stax, make sure you use a good implementation (Woodstox). Also, StaxMate (wiki.fasterxml.com/StaxMateHome) can make Stax usage much simpler. –  StaxMan Apr 16 '11 at 20:05
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