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Today I was designing a transparent PNG background that would only sit in the top left of a div, and the rest of the div would maintain a gradient background for all transparent areas of the PNG, and the rest of the div itself.

It might be better to explain through the code I thought might work:

#mydiv .isawesome { 
    /* Basic color for old browsers, and a small image that sits in the top left corner of the div */
    background: #B1B8BD url('../images/sidebar_angle.png') 0 0 no-repeat;

    /* The gradient I would like to have applied to the whole div, behind the PNG mentioned above */
    background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #ADB2B6 0%, #ABAEB3 100%);
    background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0%,#ADB2B6), color-stop(100%,#ABAEB3));
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient( startColorstr='#ADB2B6', endColorstr='#ABAEB3',GradientType=0 );
}

What I've been finding is that most browsers pick one or the other - most choosing the gradient since its further down the CSS file.

I know some of the guys around here will say "just apply the gradient to the PNG you're making" - but thats not ideal because the div will maintain a dynamic height - sometimes being very short, sometimes being very tall. I know this gradient isn't essential but I thought it might be worth asking y'all what you thought.

Is it possible to have a background image, while keeping the rest of the background as a gradient?

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4 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

In CSS3, background accepts multiple background values.

You can combine the background image with your gradient, separating them using a comma (for each of -moz-linear-gradient() and -webkit-gradient(), like so:

#mydiv .isawesome { 
    background: #B1B8BD url('../images/sidebar_angle.png') 0 0 no-repeat;
    background: url('../images/sidebar_angle.png') 0 0 no-repeat, 
                -moz-linear-gradient(top, #ADB2B6 0%, #ABAEB3 100%);
    background: url('../images/sidebar_angle.png') 0 0 no-repeat, 
                -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0%,#ADB2B6), color-stop(100%,#ABAEB3));
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient( startColorstr='#ADB2B6', endColorstr='#ABAEB3',GradientType=0 );
}

Unfortunately this doesn't work in IE as IE uses filter for the gradient, which it paints over the background.

To work around IE's issue you can place the filter and the background image in separate layers. That would obviate the power of CSS3 multiple backgrounds, though, since you can just do layering for all browsers...

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That makes sense, I didn't even think to count the gradient as a second background variable. Thanks for this! –  Will D. White Apr 15 '11 at 20:51
    
Is it possible to define them in seperate classes? ex: .grayButton { define grdient here } .jobsButton { define background image here } –  djschwartz Apr 3 '13 at 14:42
    
@djschwartz: What do you mean? –  BoltClock Apr 3 '13 at 14:42
    
Edited my original comment. I want one css class to define the gradient and another css class to define the background image. –  djschwartz Apr 3 '13 at 14:44
    
@djschwartz: Ah. If you want these to be layered over the same element with both classes, then it's not possible unfortunately :( –  BoltClock Apr 3 '13 at 14:48
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The order of the image and gradient is very KEY here, i want to make that clear. The gradient/image combo works best like this...

background: -webkit-gradient(linear, top, rgba(0,0,0,0.5), rgba(200,20,200,0.5)), url('../images/plus.png');

background-image will also work...

background-image: -webkit-gradient(linear, top, rgba(0,0,0,0.5), rgba(200,20,200,0.5)), url('../images/plus.png');

the gradient needs to come first... to go on top. The absolute key here though is that the gradient uses at least 1 RGBA color... the color(s) need to be transparent to let the image come through. (rgba(20,20,20,***0.5***)). putting the gradient first in you css places the gradient on top of the image, so the lower the alpha setting on you RGBAs the more you see the image.

Now on the other hand if you use the reverse order the PNG needs to have transparent properties, just like the gradient, to let the gradient shine through. The image goes on top so your PNG needs to be saved as a 24 bit in photoshop with alpha areas... or a 32 bit in fireworks with alpha areas (or a gif i guess... barf), so you can see the gradient underneath. In this case the gradient can use HEX RGB or RGBA.

The key difference here is the look. The image will be much more vibrant when on top. When underneath you have the ability to tune the RGBA values in the browser to get the desired effect... instead of editing and saving back and forth from your image editing software.

Hope this helps, excuse my over simplification.

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Perfectly explained! Thanks!! –  Fernando Prieto Mar 23 at 14:24
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This is possible using multiple background syntax:

.example3 {
    background-image: url(../images/plus.png), -moz-linear-gradient(top,  #cbe3ba,  #a6cc8b);
    background-image: url(../images/plus.png), -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, from(#cbe3ba), to(#a6cc8b));
}

I read about this at Here's One Solution.

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Transparent images are not yet a CSS standard, yet they are supported by most modern browsers. However, this is part of the W3C CSS3 recommendation. Implementation varies from one client to another, so you will have to use more than one syntax for cross-browser compatibility.

http://www.handycss.com/effects/transparent-image-in-css/

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The link is about CSS opacity on divs. It does not relate to transparent background images or gradients. –  whitehat101 Aug 14 '12 at 4:51
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