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How can i (in mongodb) combine data from multiple collections in to one collection?

Can i use map-reduce if so then how?

I would greatly appreciate some example as i am a novice.

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Do you just want to copy docs from different collections into one single collection or what's your plan? Can you specify "combine"? If you just want to copy via mongo shell a db.collection1.find().forEach(function(doc){db.collection2.save(doc)}); is enough. Please specify your used driver (java, php, ...) if you don't use mongo shell. –  proximus Apr 15 '11 at 22:11
    
so i have a collection (say users) than have other collections says address book collection, list of books collections, etc. How can i based on the say user_id key combine these collections in to just one single collection. ? –  user697697 Apr 18 '11 at 13:53
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3 Answers 3

Although you can't do this real-time, you can run map-reduce multiple times to merge data together by using the "reduce" out option in MongoDB 1.8+ map/reduce (see http://www.mongodb.org/display/DOCS/MapReduce#MapReduce-Outputoptions). You need to have some key in both collections that you can use as an _id.

For example, let's say you have a users collection and a comments collection and you want to have a new collection that has some user demographic info for each comment.

Let's say the users collection has the following fields:

  • _id
  • firstName
  • lastName
  • country
  • gender
  • age

And then the comments collection has the following fields:

  • _id
  • userId
  • comment
  • created

You would do this map/reduce:

var mapUsers, mapComments, reduce;
db.users_comments.remove();

// setup sample data - wouldn't actually use this in production
db.users.remove();
db.comments.remove();
db.users.save({firstName:"Rich",lastName:"S",gender:"M",country:"CA",age:"18"});
db.users.save({firstName:"Rob",lastName:"M",gender:"M",country:"US",age:"25"});
db.users.save({firstName:"Sarah",lastName:"T",gender:"F",country:"US",age:"13"});
var users = db.users.find();
db.comments.save({userId: users[0]._id, "comment": "Hey, what's up?", created: new ISODate()});
db.comments.save({userId: users[1]._id, "comment": "Not much", created: new ISODate()});
db.comments.save({userId: users[0]._id, "comment": "Cool", created: new ISODate()});
// end sample data setup

mapUsers = function() {
    var values = {
        country: this.country,
        gender: this.gender,
        age: this.age
    };
    emit(this._id, values);
};
mapComments = function() {
    var values = {
        commentId: this._id,
        comment: this.comment,
        created: this.created
    };
    emit(this.userId, values);
};
reduce = function(k, values) {
    var result = {}, commentFields = {
        "commentId": '', 
        "comment": '',
        "created": ''
    };
    values.forEach(function(value) {
        var field;
        if ("comment" in value) {
            if (!("comments" in result)) {
                result.comments = [];
            }
            result.comments.push(value);
        } else if ("comments" in value) {
            if (!("comments" in result)) {
                result.comments = [];
            }
            result.comments.push.apply(result.comments, value.comments);
        }
        for (field in value) {
            if (value.hasOwnProperty(field) && !(field in commentFields)) {
                result[field] = value[field];
            }
        }
    });
    return result;
};
db.users.mapReduce(mapUsers, reduce, {"out": {"reduce": "users_comments"}});
db.comments.mapReduce(mapComments, reduce, {"out": {"reduce": "users_comments"}});
db.users_comments.find().pretty(); // see the resulting collection

At this point, you will have a new collection called users_comments that contains the merged data and you can now use that. These reduced collections all have _id which is the key you were emitting in your map functions and then all of the values are a sub-object inside the value key - the values aren't at the top level of these reduced documents.

This is a somewhat simple example. You can repeat this with more collections as much as you want to keep building up the reduced collection. You could also do summaries and aggregations of data in the process. Likely you would define more than one reduce function as the logic for aggregating and preserving existing fields gets more complex.

You'll also note that there is now one document for each user with all of that user's comments in an array. If we were merging data that has a one-to-one relationship rather than one-to-many, it would be flat and you could simply use a reduce function like this:

reduce = function(k, values) {
    var result = {};
    values.forEach(function(value) {
        var field;
        for (field in value) {
            if (value.hasOwnProperty(field)) {
                result[field] = value[field];
            }
        }
    });
    return result;
};

If you want to flatten the users_comments collection so it's one document per comment, additionally run this:

var map, reduce;
map = function() {
    var debug = function(value) {
        var field;
        for (field in value) {
            print(field + ": " + value[field]);
        }
    };
    debug(this);
    var that = this;
    if ("comments" in this.value) {
        this.value.comments.forEach(function(value) {
            emit(value.commentId, {
                userId: that._id,
                country: that.value.country,
                age: that.value.age,
                comment: value.comment,
                created: value.created,
            });
        });
    }
};
reduce = function(k, values) {
    var result = {};
    values.forEach(function(value) {
        var field;
        for (field in value) {
            if (value.hasOwnProperty(field)) {
                result[field] = value[field];
            }
        }
    });
    return result;
};
db.users_comments.mapReduce(map, reduce, {"out": "comments_with_demographics"});

This technique should definitely not be performed on the fly. It's suited for a cron job or something like that which updates the merged data periodically. You'll probably want to run ensureIndex on the new collection to make sure queries you perform against it run quickly (keep in mind that your data is still inside a value key, so if you were to index comments_with_demographics on the comment created time, it would be db.comments_with_demographics.ensureIndex({"value.created": 1});

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I would probably never do that in production software, but it's still a wicked cool technique. –  Dave Griffith Jan 5 '12 at 18:02
    
Thanks, Dave. I used this technique for generating export and reporting tables for a high traffic site in production for the last 3 months without issue. Here's another article that describes a similar use of the technique: tebros.com/2011/07/… –  rmarscher Jan 6 '12 at 15:53
    
This is the best way to do this. You have explained it perfectly. Thanks. –  astro Jan 7 at 11:23
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You've to do that in your application layer. If you're using an ORM, it could use annotations (or something similar) to pull references that exist in other collections. I only have worked with Morphia, and the @Reference annotation fetches the referenced entity when queried, so I am able to avoid doing it myself in the code.

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You have to perform multiple queries.

MongoDB = no JOINs

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No actually Map reduce can merge many collections results. –  XenoN Apr 30 '13 at 21:09
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