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I have a problem with the following code fragment. It's intended to handle events (provided via calls on processEvent method) which are added to an event queue (ConcurrentLinkedQueue). Events are added to an event queue and processed periodically in the run method.

All is fine almost always. But sometimes after a call on the processEvent method, when an event is added to the queue, the run part fails to see there is a new event.

Any idea on what is wrong? Besides the obvious mistake in using a String constant as a lock?

import java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentLinkedQueue;

public class MyCommunicator implements Runnable {

private ConcurrentLinkedQueue<MyEvent> eventQueue = null;

private boolean stopped = false;

private String lock = "";
private Thread thread = null;

public MyCommunicator() {

    eventQueue = new ConcurrentLinkedQueue<MyEvent>();
}

public void start() {
    thread = new Thread(this, "MyCommunicatorThread");
    thread.start();
}

public void stop() {
    stopped = true;
    synchronized (lock) {
        lock.notifyAll();
    }
    eventQueue.clear();
}

public void run() {
    while (!stopped) {
        try {

            MyEvent event = null;
            while (!stopped && ((event = eventQueue.peek()) != null)) {
                sendEvent(event);
                eventQueue.poll();
            }

            if (!stopped) {
                synchronized (lock) {
                    lock.wait(10000L);
                }
            }
        }

        catch (Exception e) {

        }
    }
}

/**
 * START EVENT JOB - ADD A NEW EVENT TO BE PROCESSED
 */
public void processEvent(MyEvent event) {
    eventQueue.offer(event);
    synchronized (lock) {
        lock.notifyAll();
    }
}

/**
 * END EVENT JOB
 */
private void sendEvent(MyEvent event) {
    // do send event job
}

}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have what's known as a missed signal. You poll the queue and then wait on the monitor (taking the lock). The producer threads add events and then call notifyAll() (taking the lock). There is no happens-before relationship between event queuing/poll and the conditional await/notification.

It is therefore possible for thread A to poll while empty and then try to acquire the lock, meanwhile thread B adds an element and acquires the lock, notifying all awaiting threads then releasing the lock. Thread A then acquires the lock and awaits it, but the signal has been missed.

As you are using the lock purely for signalling, you might consider another mechanism such as a reusable latch like Doug Lea's new jdk7 Phaser, or just use a BlockingQueue directly.

Alternatively we have a couple of ReusableLatch such as a BooleanLatch for a single reader thread or a PhasedLatch for multi-party support.

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Thank you! I was just reading about this type of problem (missed signal) Brian Goetz's Java Concurency in Practice. I should move the start of the synchronized block right at the beginning of the run method, before while (!stopped) {. –  mb3_48900 Apr 17 '11 at 7:48

Why are you using locks and notifications?

Use a LinkedBlockingQueue instead and save yourself all the hassle.

That with a timeout on the poll() will accomplish everything you're trying to do.


Edit: In regard to the current code;

You would need to define "fails to see there is a new event". Your run() method looks at the queue every 10 seconds; if there's something in the queue it'll "see it" and pull it out.

  • If you mean "It doesn't see it immediately when notified, only 10 seconds later", then that's fairly easy to answer as you have a race condition which could easily cause that to occur. Something can be inserted into the queue while this thread is between when it has finished checking/processing the queue and acquiring the lock. Without a timeout on wait() you would block until the next event was inserted. If the stop() method was calling during this time, you'd lose any events in the queue. Using the LinkedBlockingQueue rather than all the unnecessary locking and notifying solves this problem. This isn't an "easy" solution, it's the correct one for this use case and problem.

  • If that's not the case, then you're simply not inserting anything into the queue and the problem lies in code you didn't post here. A guess without knowing anything about that code would be that you're attempting to insert a null MyEvent at eventQueue.offer(event). Since you aren't try/catch'ing offer() you wouldn't know it. Ignoring all exceptions and not checking returned values is neither a good idea or practice.

  • A third possibility would be that you have some other code somewhere locking on the same exact interned string literal reference which would cause this code to hang. You mention it but I'll reiterate here - that's a REALLY bad thing to be doing, especially given that it's the empty string. The java.util.concurrent package provides real locks with conditions if you insist on using them here. Note that this will still not eliminate the race condition you have in regard to sometimes missing an event for 10 seconds, but it'll at least be cleaner. To eliminate your race condition you'd want to ditch the concurrent queue for a regular one and simply acquire the lock before accessing it (as well as acquiring the lock for inserts). This will synchronize your threads as an inserter will be prevented from inserting unless this thread is waiting on the lock condition. Mixing lock and lock-free approaches to thread synchronization in the same chunk of code will often lead to these issues.

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Ok, thanks, that's a valid option. But I want to find the problem in this particular code fragment. –  mb3_48900 Apr 15 '11 at 21:08
    
The way to "fix" it is by not approaching the problem incorrectly in the first place. –  Brian Roach Apr 15 '11 at 21:15
    
As much as I would suggest finding the correct resolution I have to agree with Brian here - The above code is extremely over engineered –  John Vint Apr 15 '11 at 21:17
    
You can't always take the easy way. So... please, stick to finding problems in the code above, not suggesting completely different ways of doing the same thing... :-) –  mb3_48900 Apr 15 '11 at 21:23
    
Brian, I don't like "fixing" a problem before understanding where it goes wrong. Chances are that the same fault will exist by using the blocking queue as well. I want to know exactly where the problem is before doing anything about it. The code above works fine for a long period of time. –  mb3_48900 Apr 16 '11 at 13:12

No particular idea on first glance, but any number of things could be going wrong without your knowledge, because of this:

    catch (Exception e) {

    }

A handler that catches any Exception (which include RuntimeException and its various subclasses) and then ignores it is generally a bad idea. If this is meant to catch a specific type of exception (like, say, the InterruptedException that can probably be thrown by lock.wait()), then you should limit it to that exception type. If you have some reason for catching any exception, then you should at least log something when an exception occurs.

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Thank you! That's true. The code works for weeks without a problem (did some tests) and suddenly fails to handle one event. It's not related to machine load or number of events (once it happen after just a few hours). It must be something related to multithreading... but I can't put my finger on the exact problem. –  mb3_48900 Apr 16 '11 at 5:23

An issue I had with ConcurrentLinkedQueue that i really suspect to be a genuine bug, in that it's not really full proof synchronized.

I haven't fully tested this yet, but i looked at the code and I am quite sure that .isEmpty() is not synchronized if the queue actually is empty. While one thread invokes .isEmpty() and true is returned, the queue might already contain elements.

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