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I have an array of ints

int[] RowOfints = 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9;

if i enter for example value 4 i want to remove 1,2,3 from array and return what's left. How to do that?

share|improve this question
    
Why are you removing 1,2,3 because of the value 4? Is it their value or their position? – Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 15 '11 at 21:04
    
@Jeffrey i dont think it makes really difference when he has a sequential array, sir. – Bastardo Apr 15 '11 at 21:10
    
@EmreVeriyaz - True, but is the array sequence an invarient or is it just an example? If it is always a sequential list, then there is not really a good reason to even store it in an array to begin with! – Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 15 '11 at 21:13
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm interpreting your question that you want to find the index for the value 4 and then take everything starting from that index position.

var result = RowOfInts.SkipWhile(item => item != 4); // optionally, .ToArray()

result will be an IEnumerable<int> consisting of 4 .. 9. If you want a concrete array, you can use the optional ToArray() extension method as well. If no elements in the array match the given criteria, you will get a zero-length sequence.

share|improve this answer
    
@Anthony Pegram This will do. 1 more question, can i make selection of numbers For example of that array to displa values only between 4 and 7 – Michael27 Apr 15 '11 at 21:27
    
@Michael, that sounds like a Where filter. RowOfInts.Where(item => item >= 4 && item <= 7); This would return anything meeting that criteria regardless of its position within the original sequence. You can also chain these methods to filter, group, order, and/or project your data in any number of ways. Based upon your questions phrasing, you can see that there were a lot of interpretations of what you actually wanted! – Anthony Pegram Apr 15 '11 at 21:35
    
@Anthony this doesn't remove anything right, sir? – Bastardo Apr 15 '11 at 21:39
    
These LINQ methods I'm showing do not mutate the original array. It still exists in its original condition. – Anthony Pegram Apr 15 '11 at 21:40
    
What to do if the number of elements are unknown? if for ex. number are loaded from a txt file. i can display loaded ints from file. – Michael27 Apr 15 '11 at 21:45

If you don't want to use LINQ:

int[] newRowOfInts = new int[RowOfInts.Length - index];
Array.Copy(RowOfInts, index, newRowOfInts, 0, newRowOfInts.Length);
share|improve this answer

Using Skip extension in LINQ.

int[] newArray = RowOfInts.Skip(value).ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
Skip(2) skips first 2 elements in sequence. That is not what OP asked. Hmm, or, it is. Depends on interpretation. – Petar Repac Apr 15 '11 at 21:01
    
He just needs to skip value - 1. – Homam Apr 15 '11 at 21:09

OK, now that I understand the question better, I will post my version of the actual requirements (again perversely emphasising effeciency over readability):

private static int[] RemoveBeforeValue(int[] source, int value)
{
    if (source == null)
        return null;
    int valueIndex = 0;
    while (valueIndex < source.Length && source[valueIndex] != value)
        valueIndex++;
    if (valueIndex == 0)
        return source;
    int[] result = new int[source.Length - valueIndex];
    Array.Copy(source, valueIndex, result, 0, result.Length);
    return result;
}

OLD ANSWER

If you want to do it the hard (but efficient!) way, then you can do this (assuming you want to remove values less than the supplied value):

private static int[] RemoveValuesLessThan(int[] source, int newMinimum)
{
    if (source == null)
        return null;
    int lessThanCount = 0;
    for (int index = 0; index < source.Length; index++)
        if (source[index] < newMinimum)
            lessThanCount++;
    if (lessThanCount == 0)
        return source;
    int[] result = new int[source.Length - lessThanCount];
    int targetIndex = 0;
    for (int index = 0; index < source.Length; index++)
        if (source[index] >= newMinimum)
            result[targetIndex++] = source[index];
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's a lot of code for what amounts to source.Where(item => item >= newMinimum).ToArray(), isn't it? – Anthony Pegram Apr 15 '11 at 21:13
    
@Anthony Pegram - It a lot of source code, but it's actaully doing a whole lot less than your version. Yeah, yours is probably better, but I like to micro-optimize everything to death. – Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 15 '11 at 21:17
    
@Anthony Pegram - It’s funny that no one has posted your LINQ version as the answer yet. I really thought my interpretation of the question was the most likely, and your code is the most obvious implementation of the answer. – Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 15 '11 at 21:20
    
what do you think about my code sir, I want some comments from you to develop myself – Bastardo Apr 15 '11 at 21:34

output
For a sequential array of ints

public static void RemoveIntsBefore(int i) 
    {
        int[] RowOfints = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };

        for (int k = 0; k < RowOfints.Length; k++)
        {
            if (RowOfints.ElementAt(k) < i)
            {
                RowOfints[k] = i;
            }
        }

        RowOfints = RowOfints.Distinct().ToArray();
//this part is to write it on console
            //foreach (var item in RowOfints)
            //{
            //    Console.WriteLine(item);
            //}

            //Console.ReadLine();

    }

with this one your array does not have to be sequential

public static void RemoveIntsBefore(int i) 
    {
        int[] RowOfints = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 1,2 };                     

        Console.WriteLine("OUTPUT");
        foreach (var item in Enumerable.Range(i-1, RowOfints.Length + 1 - i).ToArray())
        {
            Console.WriteLine(RowOfints[item]);
        }

        Console.ReadLine();

    }
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer says "without using any temp array or LINQ", yet your code includes Distinct().ToArray(), both of which are indeed part of LINQ! – Anthony Pegram Apr 15 '11 at 21:37
    
@Anthony :D yes i shall delete this sentence – Bastardo Apr 15 '11 at 21:40
    
thanks @Anthony – Bastardo Apr 15 '11 at 21:41
    
Your result with an input of 4 would be 4 4 4 4 5 6 7 8 9. Is this your interpretation of what the original question was seeking? – Anthony Pegram Apr 15 '11 at 21:42
    
If there input were changed to { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 3, 2, 1 } then I think the result (for 4 {4, 5, 6}) is different from what the OP is asking for (for 4 {4, 5, 6, 3, 2, 1}). – Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 15 '11 at 21:42

using System.Linq; ....

int[] RowOfints = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};
int[] Answer = RowOfints.Where(x => x != 1 && x != 2 && x != 3).ToArray()
share|improve this answer
1  
And if the array had 1,000 items in sequence and the requested index was 998? – Jim Mischel Apr 15 '11 at 21:22
    
I'm not the downvoter, but the OP specified that "4" was also part of the input, and it should be used in some way or other. You should try to squeeze it in somewhere. – Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 15 '11 at 21:24
    
Ups, my bad. I misread the question. – Petar Repac Apr 16 '11 at 0:10

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