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When I write client side code, I use HTML/CSS/JavaScript and lately jQuery to both speed up coding, and use improved methods to achieve the same goal.

In my text editor I use zen-coding to speed up the writing of code, and also to avoid errors. I was looking at zen-coding as a jQuery plugin for a while, but it has a fatal flaw, that you want the HTML to be written and sent to the client plain before any javascript kicks in.

Although we can use JavaScript servers (env.js or node.js) and therefore do a lot of development server side using JavaScript and jQuery, I am not comfortable moving over yet as it is an emerging technology, and has many differences and drawbacks (and also some major advantages).

I want to continue using PHP server side, but develop in the way I am most comfortable with, and familiar with which is client side JavaScript.

Therefore - I have been looking into QueryPath which is a PHP port of jQuery that aims to take the best and most relevant parts of jQuery and re-work it to suit the server environment.

That is all great, and I have now been looking at two PHP classes capable of parsing zen-coding which when combined acts as a great templating engine and also avoids errors in my code.

The problem I am having is that neither zen-coding parsers support anywhere near a full set of zen-coding features.

So finally my questions (sorry for the rather lengthy intro)

  1. Is there a better server side zen-coding parser I can use in my PHP code?
  2. Is there a good (very concise and full featured) alternative templating system to using zen-coding? (which I know is not originally designed for this task)
  3. Is there a better approach I should take to achieve my ultimate goal of narrowing the divide between the way I code client side and server side?
  4. Is there a PHP library that implements a load of utility functions that by using will enhance the security/performance of my code without me learning all the internal workings? (like jQuery does for javascript)

NB: I am looking more for functional equivalence than syntactic similarity - although both are a plus for me.

Here is some commented test code that should illuminate what I am trying to achieve:

<?php

    // first php based zen-coding parser
    // http://code.google.com/p/zen-php
    require_once 'ZenPHP/ZenPHP.php';
    // my own wrapper function
    function zp($abbr){ return ZenPHP::expand($abbr); }

    // second php based zen-coding parser
    // https://github.com/philipwalton/PW_Zen_Coder
    require_once 'PW_Zen_Coder/PW_Zen_Coder.php';
    $zc = new PW_Zen_Coder;
    // my own wrapper function
    function pwzc($abbr){ global $zc; return $zc->expand($abbr); }

    // php port of jQuery with a new server-side flavor
    // http://querypath.org/
    require_once 'QueryPath/QueryPath.php';

    // initialize query path with simple html document structure
    qp(zp('html>head+body'))

        // add a heading and paragraph to the body
        ->find('body')
        ->html(zp('h1{Zen Coding and jQuery - Server Side}+p{This has all been implemented as a php port of JavaScript libraries}'))

        // add a comments link to the paragraph
        ->find('p')
        ->append(pwzc('span.comments>a[href=mailto:this@comment.com]{send a comment}'))

        // decide to use some jquery - so add it to the head
        ->find(':root head')
        ->append(zp('script[type=text/javascript][src=/jquery.js]'))

        // add an alert script to announce use of jQuery
        ->find(':root body')
        ->append(zp('script[type=text/javascript]{$(function(){ alert("just decided to use some jQuery") })}'))

        // send it to the browser!
        ->writeHTML();

    /* This will output the following html

    <html>
    <head>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="/jquery.js"></script>
    </head>
    <body>
    <h1>
        Zen Coding and jQuery - Server Side
    </h1>
    <p>
        This has all been implemented as a php port of JavaScript libraries
    <span class="comments">
        <a href="mailto:this@comment.com">

            send a comment
        </a>
    </span>
    </p>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        $(function(){ alert("just decided to use some jQuery") })
    </script>
    </body>
    </html>

    */
?>

Any help is much appreciated

share|improve this question
    
Hey Bllly! You've helped me with a question before. You're so smart! This must be a really tough problem! –  Briz Apr 15 '11 at 21:18
    
I am guessing you are the one who voted for the question then! Hopefully not a tough question for the person who gives the right answer :) –  Billy Moon Apr 15 '11 at 21:27
    
There are many PHP frameworks, which like JQuery does for JS, help speed up coding. Zend Framework, Kohana, CodeIgniter... I am afraid that you will never find anything that makes the two match in style however because needs from a language on a server are very different than needs from a language client side. –  dqhendricks Apr 15 '11 at 21:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+200

first of all i want to say i have up-voted your answer because it is well explained and have some nice point to consider; then i want let you think about theese other point:

GOTCHAS

  1. IMHO you are overcomplicating the whole thing ;)

  2. between the entire PHP code needed to generate the HTML and the outputted HTML itself there is very very low difference in term of lenght of writed-code.

  3. the code is completely unredeable for everyone who don't know the 3 libs or whatever it is.

  4. the speed of site-load will decrease enourmously compared to the semplicity of the vanilla HTML.

  5. what the real difference between:


h1{Zen Coding and jQuery - Server Side}+p{This has all been implemented as a php port of JavaScript libraries}

and

<h1>Zen Coding and jQuery - Server Side</h1><p>This has all been implemented as a php port of JavaScript libraries</p>

6.. as you know both zen-coding and queryPath are not intended to be used the way you are doing, at least not in a production scenario.

7.. The fact that jQuery have a good documentation and it's usefull to use doesn't mean that can be used successfully from anyone. ( the mere copy/past is not considered a coding skill IMO )

SOLUTION

it is probably the best solution for you looking at some kind of PHP Templating Engine like smarty, this will suit your needs in various way:

  1. security/performance
  2. narrowing the divide between the way I code client side and server side

an example would be: ( to be considered a very primitive example, smarty have more powerfull functionalities )

<!-- index.tpl -->
<html>
  <head> {$scriptLink} 
  </head>
  <body> <h1> {$h1Text} </h1>
    <p> {$pText} 
      <span class="comments">
        <a href="{$aLink}"> {$aText} </a>
      </span>
    </p> {$scriptFunc} 
  </body>
</html>

    // index.php
    require('Smarty.class.php');
    $smarty = new Smarty;
    $smarty->assign("scriptLink", "<script type=\"text/javascript\" src=\"/jquery.js\"></script>");
    $smarty->assign("scriptFunc", "<script type=\"text/javascript\">$(function(){ alert(\"hello world\") });</script>");
    $smarty->assign("h1Text", "Zen Coding and jQuery - Server Side");
    $smarty->assign("pText", "This has all been implemented as a php port of JavaScript libraries");
    $smarty->assign("aText", "send a comment");
    $smarty->assign("aLink", "mailto:this@comment.com|mailCheck");
    $smarty->display('index.tpl');

NOTE: the use of mailCheck, yes you should also consider eventuality some kind of variable check. smarty can do it....

hope this help. ;)

share|improve this answer

Questions 1 and 2

A template engine sort of like the ZenCoding example would be Haml. The syntax is different, but it's similarily short and quite concise in general.

If you like using ZenCoding, you could consider simply using an editor with support for it. PhpStorm for example bundles a ZenCoding plugin by default. I'm sure others (such as Vim) have plugins for this purpose as well. However, this approach will only allow you to write it: Once you've written it, the editor will expand it to the actual HTML markup.

Question 3

I think a part of this problem is that they are inherently completely different things. The client-side scripting side of things, it's typically a user-interface only. Certain programming styles and approaches are used with the browser UI. However, on the server-side, you generally have data processing, and for data processing, other types of patterns work better.

I'm a bit doubtful whether the QueryPath thinger you're using is a particularily good choice... It seems to somewhat obscure the HTML markup itself, making it harder to see what the exact result of the operations would be.

For generation of HTML markup on the server-side, I would recommend using a template engine or simply using PHP-only templates.

One approach you could use is to completely throw away server-side markup generation. Of course this is not a good idea for everything, but for complex web apps (in style of Gmail or such), you can generate the entire markup using just JavaScript. On the server, you would only use JSON to return data. This way you don't have to deal with markup on the server and can keep using jQuery or whatever on the client for the entire thing.

Question 4

Again I'm a bit doubtful about this whole thing. If you don't understand what's going on under the hood, how can you produce good code? How can you understand or debug things correctly when they go wrong or don't work as expected?

Now I don't know if you're a PHP guru or not, but personally I would suggest that you learn how things work. You don't have to write everything from scratch to do that though. Choosing a framework is a good idea, and it will do exactly what you ask: It will do many things for you, so you don't have to worry as much about security or other things.

Personally I would recommend using the Zend Framework, since it provides a wide range of components, and you can only use the parts you want - you don't have to use the whole framework at once. However, it can be a bit complex at first especially if you're not very familiar with PHP and OOP concepts, so you might have better luck initially going with some other framework.

share|improve this answer
    
Re: 1 and 2, I think HAML is a good choice, but zen-coding has the advantage of being single line, and javascript does not handle line-breaks consistently. Also zen-coding has style very close to css, so easy to learn for front-end developers. I know zen-coding works in editors, but what I want is a templating engine, not a code expander for my editor. Re:3 This way of editing does obscure the html, but is how people use jQuery. It is more like directly manipulating the DOM, so no HTML is fine by me, just maybe unfamiliar at first. Re:4 Thanks for the advice, I will give zend a good lookover. –  Billy Moon Apr 28 '11 at 10:11
    
I can't really say I like the idea of putting everything on a single line. I didn't even notice you had a P tag mixed in there when going over your code. Speaking from studies and experience, reading long lines is slower and more error prone, not to mention sideways scrolling. - I agree Zen is easy to learn based on CSS, but personally I find it better for quickly writing code (I use it myself as well) but not so much for reading or modifying it. - If jQuery code commonly does something it doesn't mean it's a good practice ;) Also, you don't typically use jQuery to generate entire documents –  Jani Hartikainen Apr 30 '11 at 13:04
    
Using jQ style to do small changes or such might work, but I don't think it's great for anything larger, because of points I mentioned (harder to read, modify, possibly performance issues). Oh, and there was this thing called Aptana Jaxer, which allowed sharing of JS code both on client and server - it was pretty neat, but seemed to fade into obscurity pretty fast. - Also Re: JS not handling line breaks. Dojo has a JS templating engine, which can use external files as templates. This pretty much fixes all the probs in JS + newlines when writing templates. Would recommend checking it out –  Jani Hartikainen Apr 30 '11 at 13:07

I'm not sure to understand your question, but I usually have this simple approach:

<?php

ob_start();

$config->js[] = 'js/jquery.js';

?>

<h1>
    <del>Zen Coding and jQuery - Server Side</del>
    <ins>HTML and PHP :-)</ins>

</h1>
<p>
    This has all been implemented <del>as a php port of JavaScript libraries</del> 
    <ins>in php</ins>
<span class="comments">
    <a href="mailto:this@comment.com">
        send a comment
    </a>
</span>
</p>
<script type="text/javascript">
    $(function(){ alert("just decided to use some jQuery") })
</script>

<?php $content = ob_get_clean() ?>

<?php require 'layout.php' ?> 

Some points:

  1. ob_start turn on the output buffer (the output is not sent to the client but stored in an internal buffer)
  2. $config->js[] = 'js/jquery.js'; will say to the layout to add a new script tag
  3. Then there is the plain HTML that have to be decorated with the layout
  4. <?php $content = ob_get_clean() ?> get the output stored in the internal buffer and assign it to a variable.
  5. <?php require 'layout.php' ?> will include the layout with the main HTML structure and some logic to print metas, title, <link> tags, <script> tags, and so on... The layout will contain a <?php echo $content ?> to print the page content.

The point 1, 4 and 5 can be delegated to a Front Controller, so the view can be just:

<?php

$config->js[] = 'js/jquery.js';

?>

<h1>
    <del>Zen Coding and jQuery - Server Side</del>
    <ins>HTML and PHP :-)</ins>

</h1>
<p>
    This has all been implemented <del>as a php port of JavaScript libraries</del> 
    <ins>in php</ins>
<span class="comments">
    <a href="mailto:this@comment.com">
        send a comment
    </a>
</span>
</p>
<script type="text/javascript">
    $(function(){ alert("just decided to use some jQuery") })
</script>
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for your reply - it does not exactly answer my questions which are primarily trying to allow me to write server code in the style of jQuery. For example, using selectors and chained functions that can add and remove DOM elements in a very flexible way. However, it is good to get a clear overview from you of how simple php templating can be achieved. –  Billy Moon Apr 15 '11 at 23:11

I think that you are entirely missing the point of ZenCoding. ZenCoding is meant to be integrated in your editor, not in your application. It's a way of quickly writing HTML using fewer keystrokes and with fewer errors. Your commented test code doesn't look all that usable to me. I prefer the plain HTML version.

If speed and quality of writing plain HTML is an issue for you, perhaps it's time to switch to a better editor? One with support for ZenCoding, auto-balancing HTML tags, autocompletion, snippets/templates, etcetera? I have configured Vim to do all this for me. I've been told StormPHP is also quite good.

share|improve this answer
    
I know zen-coding is not originally designed to be template, I stated that in the question and asked if there is a better alternative. My idea is not to save a few keystrokes whilst I am coding. My idea is to narrow the divide between front-end and server side scripting. I want that a few lines of code can be portable between the back-end and the front-end, and produce the same result, either parsed by the server, or executed as javascript client side. My dream is to be able to code a sidebar for example, where css is added in head, html in body, and so in as a single block of portable code... –  Billy Moon Apr 28 '11 at 10:04

I'm considerably biased in my answer, as I am the author of QueryPath, but I like what you are trying to do. (It's always thrilling to see my code used in a way I never anticipated.)

QueryPath has an extension mechanism. Using it, you can add methods directly to QueryPath. So you could, for example, write a simple plugin that would let you replace qp()->find()->append(zp()) with something like qp()->zp($selector, $zencode);.

You can take a look at the extensions in QueryPath/Extensions and see how they work. (QPXML.php is an easy one to grok.)

If you do end up building (and releasing) a solution, please let me know.

share|improve this answer

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