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Is there a way to check to see if a pid corresponds to a valid process? I'm getting a pid from a different source other than from os.getpid() and I need to check to see if a process with that pid doesn't exist on the machine.

I need it to be available in Unix and Windows. I'm also checking to see if the PID is NOT in use.

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1  
Windows is a non-standard OS. These kinds of things are NOT portable. Knowing you cannot have both, which is your priority? Pick one as a priority and edit the question. –  S.Lott Feb 20 '09 at 11:01
7  
@S.Lott Windows is a non-standard OS This is one of the most silly remark I've seen on SO... –  Piotr Dobrogost Jul 12 '13 at 21:08
    
@Piotr Dobrogost: Can you provide code that handles POSIX standard unix and non-POSIX standard Windows? If so, please provide an answer that (a) solves the problem and (b) makes it clear that Windows is somehow compliant with the POSIX standard. –  S.Lott Jul 15 '13 at 17:49
    
@PiotrDobrogost I think S.Lott's remark was more about implementation details and API support than market share. –  Roy Tinker Apr 8 at 18:46

9 Answers 9

up vote 43 down vote accepted

Sending signal 0 to a pid will raise an OSError exception if the pid is not running, and do nothing otherwise.

import os

def check_pid(pid):        
    """ Check For the existence of a unix pid. """
    try:
        os.kill(pid, 0)
    except OSError:
        return False
    else:
        return True
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2  
Works for sure in linux and OSX, I can't speak for Windows. It does not kill the process in the sense that you are asking, it sends signal 0, which is basically "Are you running?". –  mluebke Feb 20 '09 at 4:40
3  
This definitely doesn't work on Windows, as there's no such thing as UNIX-like signals. –  Alex Lebedev Feb 20 '09 at 6:14
5  
To be complete, you should also check for the error number to make sure it is 3 (catch the exception and check for first arg). This is important if the target process exists but you don't have permission to send signal (for whatever reason). –  haridsv Apr 6 '10 at 22:21
5  
Supported by windows now. docs.python.org/library/os.html?highlight=os.kill#os.kill –  michael Jun 8 '11 at 17:24
5  
os.kill is supported on Windows, but os.kill(pid, 0) is the same as os.kill(pid, signal.CTRL_C_EVENT) which may terminate the process (or fail). I get an OSError where errno==EINVAL when I try this on a subprocess. –  Jason R. Coombs Feb 22 '12 at 12:40

mluebke code is not 100% correct; kill() can also raise EPERM (access denied) in which case that obviously means a process exists. This is supposed to work:

(edited as per Jason R. Coombs comments)

import errno
import os
import sys

def pid_exists(pid):
    """Check whether pid exists in the current process table.
    UNIX only.
    """
    if pid < 0:
        return False
    if pid == 0:
        # According to "man 2 kill" PID 0 refers to every process
        # in the process group of the calling process.
        # On certain systems 0 is a valid PID but we have no way
        # to know that in a portable fashion.
        raise ValueError('invalid PID 0')
    try:
        os.kill(pid, 0)
    except OSError as err:
        if err.errno == errno.ESRCH:
            # ESRCH == No such process
            return False
        elif err.errno == errno.EPERM:
            # EPERM clearly means there's a process to deny access to
            return True
        else:
            # According to "man 2 kill" possible error values are
            # (EINVAL, EPERM, ESRCH)
            raise
    else:
        return True

You can't do this on Windows unless you use pywin32, ctypes or a C extension module. If you're OK with depending from an external lib you can use psutil:

>>> import psutil
>>> psutil.pid_exists(2353)
True
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haridsv suggests the test should be e.errno != 3; perhaps e.errno != errno.ESRCH –  Jason R. Coombs Feb 22 '12 at 12:12
    
Why? ESRCH means "no such process". –  Giampaolo Rodolà Feb 23 '12 at 19:27
1  
Right. Since ESRCH means "no such process", errno != ESRCH means "not no such process" or "process exists", which is very similar to the name of the function. You mentioned specifically EPERM, but what do the other possible error codes imply? It seems incorrect to single out an error code which is loosely related to the intent of the check, whereas ESRCH seems closely related. –  Jason R. Coombs Feb 24 '12 at 16:42
    
You're right. I edited the code which now reflects what you suggested. –  Giampaolo Rodolà Dec 17 '13 at 14:11

Have a look at the psutil module:

psutil is a module providing an interface for retrieving information on all running processes and system utilization (CPU, memory, disks, network, users) in a portable way by using Python, [...]

It currently supports Linux, Windows, OSX, FreeBSD and Sun Solaris, both 32-bit and 64-bit, with Python versions from 2.4 to 3.3 by using a single code base. Pypy is also known to work.

It has a function called pid_exists() that you can use to check whether a process with the given pid exists.

Here's an example:

import psutil
pid = 12345
if psutil.pid_exists(pid):
    print "a process with pid %d exists" % pid
else:
    print "a process with pid %d does not exist" % pid

For reference:

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Look here for windows-specific way of getting full list of running processes with their IDs. It would be something like

from win32com.client import GetObject
def get_proclist():
    WMI = GetObject('winmgmts:')
    processes = WMI.InstancesOf('Win32_Process')
    return [process.Properties_('ProcessID').Value for process in processes]

You can then verify pid you get against this list. I have no idea about performance cost, so you'd better check this if you're going to do pid verification often.

For *NIx, just use mluebke's solution.

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Combining Giampaolo Rodolà's answer for POSIX and mine for Windows I got this:

import os
if os.name == 'posix':
    def pid_exists(pid):
        """Check whether pid exists in the current process table."""
        import errno
        if pid < 0:
            return False
        try:
            os.kill(pid, 0)
        except OSError as e:
            return e.errno == errno.EPERM
        else:
            return True
else:
    def pid_exists(pid):
        import ctypes
        kernel32 = ctypes.windll.kernel32
        SYNCHRONIZE = 0x100000

        process = kernel32.OpenProcess(SYNCHRONIZE, 0, pid)
        if process != 0:
            kernel32.CloseHandle(process)
            return True
        else:
            return False
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The windows version does not work for me on windows 8.1. You have to check GetExitCodeProcess and make sure you even have access. –  speedplane May 1 at 14:04

I'd say use the PID for whatever purpose you're obtaining it and handle the errors gracefully. Otherwise, it's a classic race (the PID may be valid when you check it's valid, but go away an instant later)

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I should have been more specific - I'm checking for the INVALIDITY. So, I basically want to be able to see if a pid is NOT in use. –  Evan Fosmark Feb 20 '09 at 8:29
    
But what will you do with that answer? The instant after you've gained that knowledge, something might use that pid. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Feb 20 '09 at 9:40
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever - that's alright if something is using it after I gain that knowledge, and I understand what you're saying about the race condition, but I can assure you that it doesn't apply for my situation. –  Evan Fosmark Feb 20 '09 at 17:32

In Python 3.3+, you could use exception names instead of errno constants. Posix version:

import os

def pid_exists(pid): 
    if pid < 0: return False #NOTE: pid == 0 returns True
    try:
        os.kill(pid, 0) 
    except ProcessLookupError: # errno.ESRCH
        return False # No such process
    except PermissionError: # errno.EPERM
        return True # Operation not permitted (i.e., process exists)
    else:
        return True # no error, we can send a signal to the process
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Building upon ntrrgc's I've beefed up the windows version so it checks the process exit code and checks for permissions:

def pid_exists(pid):
    """Check whether pid exists in the current process table."""
    if os.name == 'posix':
        import errno
        if pid < 0:
            return False
        try:
            os.kill(pid, 0)
        except OSError as e:
            return e.errno == errno.EPERM
        else:
            return True
    else:
        import ctypes
        kernel32 = ctypes.windll.kernel32
        HANDLE = ctypes.c_void_p
        DWORD = ctypes.c_ulong
        LPDWORD = ctypes.POINTER(DWORD)
        class ExitCodeProcess(ctypes.Structure):
            _fields_ = [ ('hProcess', HANDLE),
                ('lpExitCode', LPDWORD)]

        SYNCHRONIZE = 0x100000
        process = kernel32.OpenProcess(SYNCHRONIZE, 0, pid)
        if not process:
            return False

        ec = ExitCodeProcess()
        out = kernel32.GetExitCodeProcess(process, ctypes.byref(ec))
        if not out:
            err = kernel32.GetLastError()
            if kernel32.GetLastError() == 5:
                # Access is denied.
                logging.warning("Access is denied to get pid info.")
            kernel32.CloseHandle(process)
            return False
        elif bool(ec.lpExitCode):
            # print ec.lpExitCode.contents
            # There is an exist code, it quit
            kernel32.CloseHandle(process)
            return False
        # No exit code, it's running.
        kernel32.CloseHandle(process)
        return True
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this will work for linux, for exemple if you want to check if banshee is runing... ( banshee is a music player )

import subprocess

def running_process(process):
    "check if process is runing. < process > is the name of the process."

    proc = subprocess.Popen(["if pgrep "+process+" >/dev/null 2>&1; then echo 'True'; else echo 'False'; fi"], stdout=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True)

    (Process_Existance, err) = proc.communicate()
    return Process_Existance

# use the function
print running_process(banshee)
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