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While building a Javascript-heavy web application, what is the best practice for naming CSS classes to keep the Javascript code and CSS stylesheets clean and the UI structure flexible?


Option 1: Name every single element uniquely.

For example,

// HTML
<div id="list">
  <button class="list-delete" />
  <div class="list-items">
    <div class="item">
      <button class="item-delete" />
      <h1 class="item-name">Item 1</h1>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

// CSS
.list-delete {
  color: black;
}

.item-delete {
  color: blue;
}

// Javascript
$(".list-delete").show();
$(".item-delete").hide();

Pros:

  • Selecting an item for styling or JS manipulation is easy

Cons:

  • Element names start becoming really long and hard to keep track of
  • Changing the HTML structure requires lots of renaming

Option 2: Name every element semantically, and select elements hierarchically.

For example,

// HTML
<div id="list">
  <button class="delete" />
  <div class="items">
    <div class="item">
      <button class="delete" />
      <h1 class="name">Item 1</h1>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

// CSS
#list > .delete {
  color: black;
}

#list > .items > .item > .delete {
  color: blue;
}

// Javascript
$("#list > .delete").show();
$("#list > .items > .item > .delete").hide();

Pros:

  • Naming feels more natural, and names are short and clear

Cons:

  • Selecting an element for styling or manipulation is unwieldy
  • Changing the HTML structure requires changing a lot of selectors, since names are tied to hierarchical structure

Option 3...n: Some hybrid approach? A totally different approach altogether?

Keep in mind the problem of name collision when adding more elements in the future, especially when you have nested elements. Also, the ideal solution would make it easy to change the HTML structure of existing elements without too much disruption everywhere else.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Trying to deal with unique names can work well for small projects, but the larger you get the more likely you will have conflicts.

That is why I like the second approach.

However, to make it easier, you can use SASS, to pre process your css files. You can then do nesting like this:

#list {
    .delete {
    }
    .items {
        .item {
        }
    }
}

And you will get code similar to your second example, without having to write it all out.

As for the jQuery selectors, those would still need to be written out longhand if you wanted to do it that way, but having complex selectors like that is often considered a sign of a bad design.

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I tried this, and then I ended up with lots of long jQuery selectors, and when I wanted to change the structure of the HTML slightly, I had to change lots of lines of jQuery code. Isn't there a better way? –  Chetan Apr 15 '11 at 22:11
1  
The better way is to not rely on jQuery selectors so much. Using large selectors like that leads to exactly the problem you describe. Instead, modularize your code and use jQuery.find() to get elements from a component instead of always using global selectors. –  Alan Geleynse Apr 15 '11 at 22:13
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I would recommend being as conservative as possible when adding classes and IDs to your HTML. In most circumstances, using IDs for the major sections of the content and using tag selectors will work just as well as putting classes on everything. The HTML in your example could more succinctly be rewritten as:

<div id="list">
  <button class="delete" />
  <div class="items">
    <div>
      <button class="delete" />
      <h1>Item 1</h1>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

And then the jQuery selectors would be:

$("#list > .delete").show();
$(".items .delete").hide();

(You could use HTML5 tags that are more semantic and thus rely even less on classes, but I'll assume that's beyond the scope of the question.)

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2  
Using IDs is actually better, wherever possible, because it uses the native JavaScript getElementById which is quicker than jQuery's selection by class. –  Blowski Apr 15 '11 at 22:15
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It really depends on the structure and size of your page.

Some situations will perform better using Option 1, some will be better with Option 2.

I usually go with "Whatever Is Best For This Specific Scenario"

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The cleanest solution would be to decouple everything: HTML - CSS - JS.

To do that, you would use your first approach (the individual naming allows the CSS-classes to be applied to any HTML-element) but additionally you add specially named classes for JS. Like this you don't have to be afraid to break your JS if they remove a CSS class and vice versa.

A good read about how to best implement such a naming convention: http://nicolasgallagher.com/about-html-semantics-front-end-architecture/

// HTML
<div id="list">
  <button class="list-delete js-list-delete" />
  <div class="list-items">
    <div class="item">
      <button class="item-delete js-item-delete" />
      <h1 class="item-name">Item 1</h1>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

// CSS
.list-delete {
  color: black;
}

.item-delete {
  color: blue;
}

// Javascript 
$(".js-list-delete").show();
$(".js-item-delete").hide();
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I like (and use) the same approach: I use classes for styling (in the CSS) and classes for "selecting" (group by behaviour), when I cannot use IDs. But being rather new to jQuery I wonder: is it considered best-practice? Which are the advantages and disadvantages? –  Lorenzo Dematté May 15 at 15:04
    
The main advantage is maintainability. With this approach you avoid interdependencies of js and css: no class that is used for styling appears in the js code, so you can add or remove them as you need, whether you are working on js or styling with css, you are safe nothing will break. In addition I would suggest specific state classes, like: 'state-selected', 'state-valid', 'state-error', etc... These are clases that are used for styling purposes but are added via js, so they are kind of a special case, because you cannot avoid that they appear in both, css and js code. –  evami May 16 at 17:48
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Option 1: Name every single element uniquely.

This is next to impossible and definitely not a best practice. I think it's better if you can use classes that makes sense by grouping relevant styles and properties.

Option 2: Name every element semantically, and select elements hierarchically.

I prefer this one. At least you know the flow and where things are.

Option 3...n: Some hybrid approach? A totally different approach altogether?

There's always a hybrid approach and totally different approach. I think every developer has their own style of coding. If it's sematically correct and well structured, that would be the best approach.

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That's a very good question. I think your first option (name every single element uniquely) is the right one, because:

  • The element classes (not names) are not that long,
  • Emphasis is made on the group as a whole anyway, so the HTML structure of the group should not change very often, and
  • Defects in the UI structure can be spotted more easily that way.

That said, I would use a slightly different markup:

<div id="list">
    <button class="delete" />
    <div class="list-items">
        <div class="list-item">
            <button class="delete" />
            <h1 class="list-item-name">Item 1</h1>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
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But they can get really long, right? Every layer of nesting adds another layer to the class names. Also, in your markup, how would you select specifically the list-item's delete button? –  Chetan Apr 15 '11 at 22:14
    
@Chetan, it doesn't necessarily have to be the case, you can always interleave a container element between the layers and use it as a reference point. I would match the delete button of the first list item with $("#list .list-item:first button.delete"). –  Frédéric Hamidi Apr 15 '11 at 22:19
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