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My Python program is receiving ICMP destination unreachable messages from a raw socket. The socket is created with the following code:

socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_RAW, socket.IPPROTO_ICMP)

ICMP destination unreachable messages include a copy of a portion of the original packet. The problem I am experiencing is that the 2-byte total-length field in the embedded IPv4 header has its bytes swapped when receiving it from the socket. Because of this is fails the checksum check in my program. The packet is received with the following code:

packet, sockaddr = socket_.recvfrom(bufsize)

When I noticed that the checksum test was failing I inspected the packets with tcpdump. Here is an example:

11:54:36.377352 IP (tos 0xc0, ttl 64, id 36894, offset 0, flags [none], proto ICMP (1), length 112)
    10.200.200.200 > 10.175.211.104: ICMP host 10.175.211.13 unreachable, length 92
    IP (tos 0x0, ttl 63, id 49898, offset 0, flags [none], proto ICMP (1), length 84)
    10.175.211.104 > 10.175.211.13: ICMP echo request, id 29449, seq 6, length 64
    0x0000:  45c0 0070 901e 0000 4001 3807 0ac8 c8c8
    0x0010:  0aaf d368 0301 fcfe 0000 0000 4500 0054
    0x0020:  c2ea 0000 3f01 fcea 0aaf d368 0aaf d30d
    0x0030:  0800 403f 7309 0006 9b43 7718 e292 a89a
    0x0040:  28cf 5283 dc65 8219 2778 837b 6c54 92f4
    0x0050:  5092 e976 568c 6681 2afc 2b82 628d d0f6
    0x0060:  2fa7 3493 1f48 9fdb ed98 2f53 da0e 87a6

I then printed out the packet from my Python code. Here is the same packet from the tcpdump example:

45,c0,5c,0,90,1e,0,0,40,1,38,7,a,c8,c8,c8,
a,af,d3,68,3,1,fc,fe,0,0,0,0,45,0,54,0,
c2,ea,0,0,3f,1,fc,ea,a,af,d3,68,a,af,d3,d,
8,0,40,3f,73,9,0,6,9b,43,77,18,e2,92,a8,9a,
28,cf,52,83,dc,65,82,19,27,78,83,7b,6c,54,92,f4,
50,92,e9,76,56,8c,66,81,2a,fc,2b,82,62,8d,d0,f6,
2f,a7,34,93,1f,48,9f,db,ed,98,2f,53,da,e,87,a6,

The total-length field of the embedded header is the last two bytes on the 2nd line. 0054 from tcpdump and 5400 from my program. The total-length field of the outer IP header is also wrong (5c00 versus 0070 from tcpdump).

I am running...

Python 2.6.1 (r261:67515, Jun 24 2010, 21:47:49) [GCC 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5646)] on darwin

The checksum field in the ICMP destination unreachable packet from tcpdump is correct. It has a value of fcfe. Here is the packet without the out IP header.

0x0010:            0301 fcfe 0000 0000 4500 0054
0x0020:  c2ea 0000 3f01 fcea 0aaf d368 0aaf d30d
0x0030:  0800 403f 7309 0006 9b43 7718 e292 a89a
0x0040:  28cf 5283 dc65 8219 2778 837b 6c54 92f4
0x0050:  5092 e976 568c 6681 2afc 2b82 628d d0f6
0x0060:  2fa7 3493 1f48 9fdb ed98 2f53 da0e 87a6

What confuses me is that only the total-length field is corrected for network byte order. Other multi-byte fields are not changed and print out the same as my Python program. For example the two bytes after the total-length make up the identification field with a value of c2ea in both tcpdump and my print out. How can I determine which fields should be swapped for the purposes of checking the checksum?

share|improve this question
    
This is not really a question about checksums. It's a question about why two bytes are being swapped when you read from a socket. Perhaps you should edit your question title and body to reflect that! – Oliver Charlesworth Apr 15 '11 at 23:09
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Those fields are likely in network byte-order (i.e. big-endian), and you are using a little-endian machine. So, byte-swapping is needed. The struct library built into Python should help you with deserialization of these messages. Please refer to section 7.3.2.1. Byte Order, Size, and Alignment.

I'd recommend referring to the RFC document for each protocol (e.g. RFC 791 and RFC 792) in use to gain further knowledge of how the fields are serialized.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I played around with struct.unpack which led me to question why total-length is the only multibyte field that is swapped by tcpdump and the only one that needs to be swapped for calculating checksum. I added more info to my initial post. – Brian Edwards Apr 18 '11 at 18:24
    
@Brian A checksum is normally calculated in the order in which the bytes are placed on the wire. You shouldn't have to do byte swapping before calculating the checksum. – Judge Maygarden Apr 18 '11 at 21:37

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