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Possible Duplicate:
How to generate a random String in Java

I am wanting to generate a random string of 20 characters without using apache classes. I don't really care about whether is alphanumeric or not. Also, I am going to convert it to an array of bytes later FYI.

Thanks,

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marked as duplicate by Rich Adams, OscarRyz, Ken White, Yi Jiang, YOU Apr 16 '11 at 18:26

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Ok. So what have you tried already? – Oliver Charlesworth Apr 15 '11 at 23:33
1  
In one line:UUID.randomUUID().toString().replace("-","").substring(0,20) – Nolf Nov 19 '15 at 15:14
    
These 3 single line codes are very much useful i guess.. Long.toHexString(Double.doubleToLongBits(Math.random())); UUID.randomUUID().toString(); RandomStringUtils.randomAlphanumeric(20); – Manindar Jun 8 at 7:36
up vote 49 down vote accepted

Here you go. Just specify the chars you want to allow on the first line.

char[] chars = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz".toCharArray();
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
Random random = new Random();
for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
    char c = chars[random.nextInt(chars.length)];
    sb.append(c);
}
String output = sb.toString();
System.out.println(output);
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awesome thanks!! – novicePrgrmr Apr 15 '11 at 23:42
1  
this is not a good method...i tried getting hundred random nos. but very few were unique. I put this code in a while loop and iterated 0 to 99. many outputs were repeated.. – Nikhil Jun 20 '12 at 16:15
    
@Nikhil I suspect you did something wrong. If you need a better source of random numbers, try SecureRandom instead. That shouldn't matter for duplicates in this case though, looping over the above code I got these 100 unique strings: pastebin.com/ELZ950tk – WhiteFang34 Jun 21 '12 at 5:26
    
@WhiteFang34 Hi, I tried this code in a MIDlet. I assume this might be working fine on a desktop java application. You can check my results here :pastebin.com/yDcT41g8 . So when you use it in a MIDlet you get repeated strings. The only change i made was to use StringBuffer instead StringBuilder. – Nikhil Jun 21 '12 at 12:53
2  
@WhiteFang34 Yes..smooth. I put the random object out side of the loop and now the result is perfect. 100 randoms nos. is what i get. :) and white fang is a great book ;) ..i recommend call of the wild..just in case you haven't read it.. – Nikhil Jun 22 '12 at 3:22

I'd use this approach:

String randomString(final int length) {
    Random r = new Random(); // perhaps make it a class variable so you don't make a new one every time
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for(int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        char c = (char)(r.nextInt((int)(Character.MAX_VALUE)));
        sb.append(c);
    }
    return sb.toString();
}

If you want a byte[] you can do this:

byte[] randomByteString(final int length) {
    Random r = new Random();
    byte[] result = new byte[length];
    for(int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        result[i] = r.nextByte();
    }
    return result;
}

Or you could do this

byte[] randomByteString(final int length) {
    Random r = new Random();
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for(int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        char c = (char)(r.nextInt((int)(Character.MAX_VALUE)));
        sb.append(c);
    }
    return sb.toString().getBytes();
}
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You may use the class java.util.Random with method

char c = (char)(rnd.nextInt(128-32))+32 

20x to get Bytes, which you interpret as ASCII. If you're fine with ASCII.

32 is the offset, from where the characters are printable in general.

share|improve this answer
public String randomString(String chars, int length) {
  Random rand = new Random();
  StringBuilder buf = new StringBuilder();
  for (int i=0; i<length; i++) {
    buf.append(chars.charAt(rand.nextInt(chars.length())));
  }
  return buf.toString();
}
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