Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have huge log files somewhat like 100 mb each. Its very difficult to deal with such big files, and I know that log lines that are interesting to me are only between 200 to 400 lines or so.

So my question is how can I crop text files based on starting and ending line-numbers?

Maybe the word 'crop' might be a bit wrong here, I don't want to change the existing file. I just want to pipe the range of line numbers to another file.

For example, the inputs are:

filename: MyHugeLogFile.log
Starting line number: 38438
Ending line number:   39276

Is there a command that I can run in cygwin to cat out only that range in that file? I know that if I can somehow display that range in stdout then I can also pipe to an output file.

Thanks for any help.

Note: Adding Linux tag for more visibility, but I need a solution that might work in cygwin. (Usually linux commands do work in cygwin).

share|improve this question
    
100Mb log files are not huge ;-) –  Johnsyweb Apr 16 '11 at 0:07
    
Sure, but if you have to study parts of them in an editor like notepad++, then they appear pretty huge :) –  bits Apr 16 '11 at 4:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 39 down vote accepted

Sounds like a job for sed:

sed -n '8,12p' yourfile

...will send lines 8 through 12 of yourfile to standard out.

If you want to prepend the line number, you may wish to use cat -n first:

cat -n yourfile | sed -n '8,12p'
share|improve this answer
    
@bits: Happy to help. I appended the cat section of my answer while you typed that. Perhaps that'll be useful too. –  Johnsyweb Apr 15 '11 at 23:59
2  
I think the first solution that doesn't involve cat is most suitable for me. Simple and concise. –  bits Apr 16 '11 at 4:08

You can use wc -l to figure out the total # of lines.

You can then combine head and tail to get at the range you want. Let's assume the log is 40,000 lines, you want the last 1562 lines, then of those you want the first 838. So:

tail -1562 MyHugeLogFile.log | head -838 | ....

Or there's probably an easier way using sed or awk.

share|improve this answer

I saw this thread when I was trying to split a file in files with 100 000 lines. A better solution than sed for that is:

split -l 100000 database.sql database-

It will give files like:

database-aaa
database-aab
database-aac
...
share|improve this answer

How about this:

$ seq 1 100000 | tail -n +10000 | head -n 10
10000
10001
10002
10003
10004
10005
10006
10007
10008
10009

It uses tail to output from the 10,000th line and onwards and then head to only keep 10 lines.

The same (almost) result with sed:

$ seq 1 100000 | sed -n '10000,10010p'
10000
10001
10002
10003
10004
10005
10006
10007
10008
10009
10010

This one has the advantage of allowing you to input the line range directly.

share|improve this answer
    
Its a possible solution, but that requires me to calculate 39276-38438=838. Because I will have to use 838 as input to head. I am looking for a solution in which the input parameters are strictly the beginning and ending line numbers, i.e. 38438 and 39276. –  bits Apr 15 '11 at 23:50

If you are interested only in the last X lines, you can use the "tail" command like this.

$ tail -n XXXXX yourlogfile.log >> mycroppedfile.txt

This will save the last XXXXX lines of your log file to a new file called "mycroppedfile.txt"

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.