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Trying to create a Driver type class where, below, Base is the Driver that is passed a type at instantiation. The type, the 2 in this case, is used to construct the correct derived object.

My compiler is throwing a Declaration syntax error on the "Class Base" line.

My end goal is to be able to do this:

Base *B;

    B = new Base(2);
    if(B)
    {
      B->DoStuff();
      B->DoMoreStuff();
      delete B;
    }

Here is my code that won't compile...

class Base
{
public:

    Base(int h);
    virtual ~Base();

private:
    int hType;
    Base *hHandle;
};


class Derived1 : public Base
{
public:
    Derived1();
    virtual ~Derived1();

};

class Derived2 : public Base
{
public:
    Derived2();
    virtual ~Derived2();

};

Base::Base(int h)
{
    hType = h;

    switch(h)
    {
        case 1:
            hHandle = new Derived1;
        break;

        case 2:
            hHandle = new Derived2;
        break;

    }
}


Derived1::Derived1():Base(1)
{
    printf("\nDerived1 Initialized\n\n");
}

Derived2::Derived2():Base(2)
{
    printf("\nDerived2 Initialized\n\n");
}

Below is updated code to show the full source. I think I now understand why it will not compile. As is pointed out below, I have an endless loop of calls to 'new'

#include <stdio.h>

class Base
{
public:

    Base();
    Base(int h);
    Create (int h);
    virtual ~Base();

private:
    int hType;
    Base *hHandle;
};


class Derived1 : public Base
{
public:
    Derived1();
    virtual ~Derived1();

};

class Derived2 : public Base
{
public:
    Derived2();
    virtual ~Derived2();

};

Base::Base()
{

}

Base::Base(int h)
{
    Create(h);
}

Base::Create(int h)
{
    hType = h;

    switch(h)
    {
        case 1:
            hHandle = new Derived1;
        break;

        case 2:
            hHandle = new Derived2;
        break;

    }
}

Derived1::Derived1()
{
    printf("\nDerived1 Initialized\n\n");
}

Derived2::Derived2()
{
    printf("\nDerived2 Initialized\n\n");
}
share|improve this question
    
What's the text of the error? If it's referring to the first line of your code snippet, that doesn't look wrong. –  ssube Apr 16 '11 at 3:19
2  
What about the runtime? When you create a Base(1), the constructor creates a new Derived, which calls its base class, Base(1), which creates a new Derived, which calls its base class ... –  Bo Persson Apr 16 '11 at 10:48
    
@Eric: please use either std::unique_ptr, boost::scoped_ptr or std::auto_ptr (the latter being the worse). You have a memory leak in your toy sample :/ –  Matthieu M. Apr 16 '11 at 14:18
    
@Matthieu M: Thanks for your input but doesn't help me. boost and standard template can not be used. Code most be ported to embedded platform where these do not exist. Specifically, can you point out the memory leak? –  Eric Apr 18 '11 at 2:55
    
@Bo Persson: Ok, I think I understand. When, at run time (assuming I could get there), when I do a new Base, it is calling new Derived which requires another call to new Base again so on and so forth... got it. That helps. –  Eric Apr 18 '11 at 2:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It looks like you're trying to do a class factory.

I'd recommend that you have a static method in Base that returns either Derived1 or Derived2.

class Base
{
public:
    static Base* Create(int);
    virtual void DoStuff() = 0;
}

class Derived1 : public Base
{
    Derived1()
    {
        printf("\nDerived1 Initialized\n\n");
    }

    virtual void DoStuff()
    {
    }   
}

class Derived2 : public Base
{
    Derived2()
    {
        printf("\nDerived2 Initialized\n\n");
    }

    virtual void DoStuff()
    {
    }   
}

Base* Base::Create(int n)
{
    if (n==1)
        return new Derived1();
    else if (n==2)
        return new Derived2();
    else
        return nullptr;
}

void main()
{
    Base* B = Base::Create(2);
    if(B)
    {
        B->DoStuff();
        delete B;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
this is interesting, I can read/understand this but I'm still scratching my head over why my code won't compile? This ultimately does not answer my question. I don't want the caller to have to know the details of Base::Create. I want the caller to simply call new Base(type) if that is possible? –  Eric Apr 16 '11 at 2:58
    
First, your code is trying to call functions that it does not have declared, you would have to make proxy methods which call their counterparts in hHandle. Second, and most notably wont be caught by the compiler, the creation of Derived1 will call the Base constructor to create another instance of Derived1 in an endless loop. –  Josh Brown Apr 16 '11 at 4:33
    
Ignore the first part of that last comment... If class Base has a syntax error, it is likely due to a missing semicolon above it, possibly in an include file. I see nothing wrong with that line. Can you privide the full error from the compiler? –  Josh Brown Apr 16 '11 at 4:42
    
I don't follow how code is trying to call functions that it does not have declared? The first function, implementation, Base::Base, does now about Derived1 and Derived2, correct? If not, wouldn't a forward declaration of Derived1 and Derived2 remedy this? I tried this, by the way, and it did not work. What you see above is the full source code. The only thing missing is a #include <stdio.h> and a file1.cpp file that implements int main() to test with. –  Eric Apr 18 '11 at 2:53
    
The reason for using inheritance is to be able to reuse code in the base class. Trying to make your base class a class factory means that the base class has more than one responsibility, which violates an important design principle (Single Responsibility). In addition, if you ever add a Derived3, you'll have to touch the code in Base, which violates another design principle (Open/Closed). –  David Apr 18 '11 at 3:12

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