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Let's say that I have a Java class like this:

public class PersonGrabber {
  private PersonDAO dao;

  public void setDao(PersonDao dao) {
    this.dao = dao;
  }
  public PersonDAO getDao() {
    return this.dao;
  }
  //...
}

And I have a corresponding Spring bean like this:

<bean id="personGrabber" class="com.stackoverflow.example.PersonGrabber">
  <property name="dao"><null/></property>
</bean>

Now, this is bad because I really need the dao property to be set to something on that bean before it becomes useful. However, I don't wanna wait till runtime to wait for it to throw a NullPointerException. Is there anyway to tell Spring that a bean property MUST be populated before it can be used? Ideally, I'd like it to crash on initialization so that I don't have to wait for it to find out.

I was hoping for something like an annotation along the lines of:

public class PersonGrabber {
  @SpringRequired
  private PersonDAO dao;
  //...
}

Any help from some Spring veterans out there?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For the type of class you've got, where you always need the other property set to a non-null value, the easiest way of enforcing this is as a two-fold thing. Use the @Required annotation on the setter to tell Spring that the method always has to be called, and a check inside the setter to see if the injection is of a real instance (i.e., isn't null).

@Required
public void setDao(PersonDao dao) {
    if (dao == null)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("property 'dao' is null");
    this.dao = dao;
}

The final little part is you need to ensure that annotation processing is switched on with this in your Spring config file(s):

<context:annotation-config/>

Mind you, there's a good chance you've already got that.

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The other thing to note is that your in-setter validation code can't check anything about the other bean, as that might not be fully configured at the point when this is called. That doesn't matter for a non-null check. –  Donal Fellows Apr 18 '11 at 8:45
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The annotation you are looking for is @Required

You can also use the init-method attribute on your bean to point to a method that is called after all properties are populated. This will allow you perform post setup validation.

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1  
But @Required is only a part of the solution; it doesn't prevent the configuration from being explicitly null. –  Donal Fellows Apr 16 '11 at 7:15
1  
My preference is to use init-method rather than annotations. Annotations and the InitializingBean interface introduce a direct dependency on Spring in the application. I avoid that whereever possible. –  Fortyrunner Apr 16 '11 at 14:48
    
Great notes you guys, thanks! –  daveslab Apr 18 '11 at 2:10
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Yet another way to do this is to declare the bean class as implementing InitializingBean, and implement the afterPropertiesSet method to check that the property has been set to an acceptable value.

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What about using JSR 303 validation with spring.? Did you have some problem with that.?

Link here, In case if you have not seen it before.

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I actually ended up writing my own Spring Bean Post Processor that used Hibernate's implementation of JSR 303 so that I could put annotations like @NotNull on them. –  daveslab Jan 11 '12 at 17:08
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