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Given an enum type:

enum SOMEENUM 
{
   A = true,
   B = false,
   C = true
}

I want to switch on this like:

public void SWITCHON (SOMEENUM sn) 
{
   switch(s)
   {
      case SOMEENMUM.A : xxxxxxxx.......
   }
}

But this doesn't compile; I guess it's using the bool value of the enum.

I want to do switch on Enum as if there is no value assigned to it.

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Why is the formal parameter "sn" but the switch controller is "s"? Is that a typo, or are you intending them to be different? –  Eric Lippert Apr 16 '11 at 14:53

3 Answers 3

First of all:
Enums in C# do not support bool as value. So It should be integers. If we set 2 property's of enum to the same value we can consider one of them lost. From my understanding what you actually is trying to do is: Somehow flag that 2 property's of enum are equal.
My suggestion:

public enum MyEnum
{
    [Description("true")]
    A = 1,
    [Description("false")]
    B = 2,
    [Description("true")]
    C = 3
}

Extension for Enum which will return bool

 public static class EnumEx
    {
        public static bool GetDescriptionAsBool(this Enum value)
        {
            FieldInfo field = value.GetType().GetField(value.ToString());
            DescriptionAttribute attribute
                    = Attribute.GetCustomAttribute(field, typeof(DescriptionAttribute))
                        as DescriptionAttribute;
            if(attribute == null)
            {
                //throw new SomethingWentWrongException();
            }
            return bool.Parse(attribute.Description);
        }
    }

As a result you can switch normally and at any time can check what is your enums boll flag just calling GetDescriptionAsBool method of that instance.

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1  
I suggest you use the DefaultValueAttribute class instead, with true or false as the default value, this way it's typed and add some semantic information IMHO. Or you could also come up with a specific attribute, which is probably the best. –  Simon Mourier Apr 16 '11 at 8:23
    
I agree, but I posted this just to point how to solve current issue.Thanks to you for better implementation. –  Sonosar Apr 16 '11 at 9:13
    
i'M USING SYSTEM.ATTRIBUTE RIGHT NOW. THX. –  karl Apr 16 '11 at 22:06

Repeated values are just different names for the same thing. There's no way to tell the difference because enums are stored as the values, not as the names.

As for bool values, you use an if for those instead of a switch.

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enums require numerical values but do not have to be set. I suggest just removing leaving it like

enum SOMEENUM 
{ 
   A, 
   B,
   C
}

so

public void SWITCHON (SOMEENUM s) 
{
    switch(s) 
    { 
        case SOMEENMUM.A : ...do stuff...
             break;
        case SOMEENMUM.B : ...do stuff...
             break;
        case SOMEENMUM.c : ...do stuff...
             break;
    }
}
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2  
I am a firm believer of setting all values (to a sensible unique value) to help minimize surprise-changes in contracts if the order changes, etc. –  user166390 Apr 16 '11 at 5:54
1  
This doesn't work for the type of enums mentioned specifically in the title: those with repeated values. You missed the whole point of the question, and proposed bad design at the same time. –  Cody Gray Apr 16 '11 at 6:12

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