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How can I make something like this work:

class Outer {
  int some_member;

  abstract class InnerBase {
    abstract void method();
  }
}

class OuterExtendsInner extends Outer.InnerBase {
  OuterExtendsInner(Outer o) { o.super(); }
  void method() {
    // How do I use some_member here?
    // Writing Outer.this.some_member -> error about Outer not being an enclosing class
    // Writing just some_member -> no-go, either
  }
}

The workaround is to have a method in InnerBase that returns Outer.this and call THAT from derived classes, but is there another way?

I primarily want to extend the InnerBase from outside in order to have better code-organization, but I could move all derived classes into Outer.

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3  
"Better code organization" rarely involves inner classes, and I can't imagine it ever involving something like this. –  Anon Apr 16 '11 at 11:57
    
That's why I wanted to extend the inner class outside of the outer class. I'm implementing an interpreter, and each "inner" class models a type (name, integer, etc.). The type's behaviour might or might not need a reference to the interpreter object that created it. I've gone around the problem by passing an interpreter reference to each method that might need it. –  zvrba Apr 16 '11 at 16:19

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem here is that the synthetic field which links InnerBase to Outer is a private field. Thus, we can only access the outer object from within InnerBase, or if some method or field there provides a reference to the same object.

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1  
+1: Thanks for helping to clarify this oddity! –  Don Roby Apr 16 '11 at 12:39

You could do this in OuterExtendsInner:

class OuterExtendsInner extends Outer.InnerBase {
    Outer o;

    OuterExtendsInner(Outer o) {
        o.super();
        this.o = o;
    }

    void method() {
        // now you can reference o.some_member
        int x = o.some_member;
    }
}
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That's what I already suggested in the question (albeit, returning the reference to Outer.this from a method in InnerBase). –  zvrba Apr 16 '11 at 10:07
    
Oops, I've updated the answer with another way. –  WhiteFang34 Apr 16 '11 at 10:12
    
Moreover, there would be two instances of Outer.InnerBase in OuterExtendsInner. The one inherited and the one received in the constructor. You would not be talking about the same 'some_member'. –  JVerstry Apr 16 '11 at 10:30
1  
@JVerstry: there is in fact only one instance of Outer.InnerBase from OuterExtendsInner extending it. Inner classes (that aren't static) can't be constructed without an outer class instance. In this case the Outer class passed in is that instance and super() must be called first in the constructor for it to work. Give a try, you can verify by adding a constructor to InnerBase and printing a line out. There will only be one if you call new OuterExtendsInner(new Outer());. –  WhiteFang34 Apr 16 '11 at 10:42
    
Oops, yes you are right. –  JVerstry Apr 16 '11 at 10:51

The answer is: you can't, because it would break encapsulation. Only InnerBase can have access to attributes of Outer, not OuterExtendsInner. It is not direct inheritance. InnerBase does not inherit of Outer.

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Well, you can, because the attributes of Outer aren't really attributes of InnerBase, they just look syntactically as if they are (at least, that's how it used to be - I can't imagine that that would have changed). Besides, this problem doesn't necessarily involve any direct access to private attributes of Outer. –  Robin Green Apr 16 '11 at 10:31
    
But OuterExtendsInner inherits from InnerBase, and so it should have access to everything that InnerBase has access to. –  zvrba Apr 16 '11 at 10:36
    
@Robin Green Please provide an operational example, but you'll see it is not possible. OuterExtendsInner cannot access the attributes of Outer. –  JVerstry Apr 16 '11 at 10:39
    
@zvrba - No. When you say "it should have access to everything that InnerBase has access to", this is false. If InnerBase had private attributes, it could not access them. The access is only granted to INHERITED public and protected items, not via inner-outer relationships (with the exception that inner can access their direct outer, but not indirect). –  JVerstry Apr 16 '11 at 10:43

I haven't tried WhiteFang34's answer. It might work, but I'm not clear on it ...

If you really want to define an extension of your inner class elsewhere than in the outer class, the most natural thing would be to define it as an extension of the inner class in another outer extending your outer class as follows:

class Outer {
  int some_member;

  abstract class InnerBase {
    abstract void method();
  }
}

class OuterExtendsOuter extends Outer {
  class InnerExtendsInner extends Outer.InnerBase {
    void method() {
       System.out.println(some_member);
    }
  }
}

I haven't actually run this code either, but it should work.

Update:

Based on the comment thread, I have now compiled and run both my code above and WhiteFang34's code.

Both in fact work, but as noted in the comments by Paŭlo Ebermann, both create two copies of the outer inside the instantiated inner class.

I'm going to upvote Paŭlo's answer, and would advocate just not trying to do this by either tactic, as it's really an abuse of the inner class mechanism.

Just make your extended inner classes live inside the same outer class!

Update 2:

What happens in my code, based on runtime examination using a debugger and on examining the output from javap inspections of the classes, is that both InnerBase and OuterExtendsOuter$InnerExtendsInner have synthetic private final fields named this$0. Because no constructors are explicitly defined, the default constructors are used, and the code snippet

    OuterExtendsOuter outer = new OuterExtendsOuter();
    Outer.InnerBase inner = outer.new InnerExtendsInner();

causes these two fields to both reference outer.

In other words, Paŭlo's comment is entirely correct.

By further experimentation, the same actually happens if you extend InnerBase in another inner class of Outer, so it has little to do with it being defined in the same outer class or an extension of it, but is in fact an outcome of how non-static inner classes are handled generally.

I suspect this is documented somewhere, but I haven't seen that.

Probably best to mix inheritance and inner classes as little as possible!

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This InnerExtendsInner object has two links to enclosing classes (one for InnerExtendsInner and one for InnerBase), which by chance (e.g. by the default constructor) point to the same object. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Apr 16 '11 at 11:50
    
@Paŭlo Ebermann: I don't follow you. Perhaps I'll have to try actually compiling and running the code... –  Don Roby Apr 16 '11 at 11:55
    
I think it will work, but it is in fact similar to the answer by WhiteFang with an explicit Outer reference. (I should do an image, but I don't have enough space in this comment.) –  Paŭlo Ebermann Apr 16 '11 at 12:15

Just have a getter method in the InnerBase?

class Outer {
  int some_member;

  abstract class InnerBase {
    abstract void method();
    protected int getSome_Member() // This is possible, because Abstract classes can have non-abstract methods.
    {
       return some_member;
    }
  }
}

class OuterExtendsInner extends Outer.InnerBase {
  OuterExtendsInner(Outer o) { o.super(); }
  void method() {
       // you can access "some_member" now
      int myNumber = getSome_Member();

  }
}
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Well your problem is that every instance of InnerBase (I know it's abstract) has to have a reference to an Outer object. That is part of the semantics of nested classes. Instantiating OuterExtendsInner would need such a reference. You can avoid that making InnerBase a static nested class.

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This is not the problem, the problem is how to get a reference to this Outer object. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Apr 16 '11 at 11:43

The outer class can extend the inner class iff the inner class is compiled to ".class".

Now, every time you compile the outer class it encounters the "extends innerclass" which is

not yet compiled and the compiler will throw a NoClassDefException or ClassNotFoundException.

Isn't it ? So you will never get that inner class compiled. If you can overcome this problem

then you can also extend the inner class :) .

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