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I am writing a C++ program to convert a number 1 - 9 to its word form. my piece of code is not working and i am getting the errors such as error:

case label ‘2’ not within a switch statement problem6.cpp:21: error: break statement not within loop or switch

How to fix this?

#include <iostream> 
using namespace std; 

int main() 
{ 
    char a = 0;



    cout << "enter amount of money: "; 
    cin >> a; 

    switch (a) 

    case 1 : 
        cout << "one "; 
        break; 

    case 2 : 
        cout << "two "; 
        break; 

    case 3 :
        cout << "three "; 
        break; 

    case 4 : 
        cout << "four "; 
        break; 

    case 5 : 
        cout << "five "; 
        break; 

    case 6 : 
        cout << "six ": 
        break; 

    case 7 : 
        cout << "seven "; 
        break; 

    case 8 : 
        cout << "eight "; 
        break; 

    case 9 : 
        cout << "nine "; 
        break; 


        return 0; 

}
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6 Answers 6

The reason for the error is that you didn't enclose the switch's cases within curly braces.

But I'm wondering why don't you define an array like this:

const char* numbers[] = {"zero", "one", "two", "three", .... etc};

And use it as:

 //must check the validity of the range!
 if ( a>=0 && a<=9 ) //or whatever the range you've defined. 
     cout << numbers[a];

Its also efficient, as Acme added in the comment.

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1  
+1, this is the cleanest solution. –  larsmans Apr 16 '11 at 10:01
1  
Array is really efficient here. –  al-Acme Apr 16 '11 at 10:02
    
@Acme: Yeah. Added that to my answer. Thanks! –  Nawaz Apr 16 '11 at 10:04
    
@Acme: In fact it's equally efficient. for continuous rages switch is implemented using jump tables (your implementation) otherwise as if/else. –  cprogrammer Apr 16 '11 at 11:31
    
When i and Nawaz mentioned about efficiency we were talking about the simplistic and short nature of code, not the runtime efficiency. –  al-Acme Apr 16 '11 at 12:06

You forgot the braces. Try

switch (a) 
{
case 1 : 
    cout << "one "; 
    break; 

case 2 : 
    cout << "two "; 
    break; 

case 3 :
    cout << "three "; 
    break; 
}
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Change your variable a to an int, or change all of your cases to their character equivalent (i.e., 1 to '1', 2 to '2' etc).

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Fixed Code:

int a = 0; 

  switch (a) 

    { // Braces were missing
        case 1 : 
            cout << "one "; 
            break; 

        case 2 : 
            cout << "two "; 
            break; 

        case 3 :
            cout << "three "; 
            break; 

        case 4 : 
            cout << "four "; 
            break; 

        case 5 : 
            cout << "five "; 
            break; 

        case 6 : 
            cout << "six "; // You had a colon here instead of semi-colon
            break; 

        case 7 : 
            cout << "seven "; 
            break; 

        case 8 : 
            cout << "eight "; 
            break; 

        case 9 : 
            cout << "nine "; 
            break; 
    } // end of switch

I agree with Nawaz. Use array its much more efficient.

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You have to put all parts of the switch statement inside a pair of { }

switch(value)
{
case 1:
    Something();
    break;

case 2:
   Etc.

}
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This should work you had, amongst other things, missed a "}":

#include <iostream> 
using namespace std; 

int main() 
{ 
    char a = 0;     
    cout << "enter amount of money: "; 
    cin >> a; 

    int i = (int)a;
    switch (i) 
    {
       case 1 : 
          cout << "one "; 
          break; 
       case 2 : 
          cout << "two "; 
          break; 
       case 3 :
          cout << "three "; 
          break; 
       case 4 : 
          cout << "four "; 
          break; 
       case 5 : 
          cout << "five "; 
          break;
       case 6 : 
          cout << "six ": 
          break; 
       case 7 : 
          cout << "seven "; 
          break; 
       case 8 : 
         cout << "eight "; 
         break;
       case 9 : 
         cout << "nine "; 
         break;
    }

    return 0; 
 }
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If the user enters '1', you're going to end up passing 49 into the switch. You need to subtract '0' first (on systems using ASCII). –  jonsca Apr 16 '11 at 20:28

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