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In NHibernate 3.0 Cookbook, there is a sample implementation for a base Entity type. The equals is implemented like this:

public abstract class Entity<TId>
{
  public virtual TId Id { get; protected set; }

  public override bool Equals(object obj)
  {
    return Equals(obj as Entity<TId>);
  }

  private static bool IsTransient(Entity<TId> obj)
  {
     return obj != null && Equals(obj.Id, default(TId));
  }  

  private Type GetUnproxiedType()
  {
     return GetType();
  }  

  public virtual bool Equals(Entity<TId> other)
  {
    if (other == null) return false;            
    if (ReferenceEquals(this, other)) return true;

    if (!IsTransient(this) && !IsTransient(this) && Equals(Id, other.Id))
    {
      var otherType = other.GetUnproxiedType();
      var thisType = GetUnproxiedType();
      return thisType.IsAssignableFrom(otherType) ||
         otherType.IsAssignableFrom(thisType);
    }
    return false;
  }    
}

The reason for the GetUnproxiedType() method is this: There is an abstract base class Product, a concrete class Book which inherits from Product and a dynamic proxy class ProductProxy used by NHibernate for lazy loading. If a ProductProxy representing a Book and a concrete Book have the same Ids, they should be treated as equal. However I don't really see why calling GetType() on a ProductProxy instance should return Product in this case, and how it helps. Any ideas?

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can you attach the 'GetType()' method implementation? without seeing it, i'm guessing that it returns the "concrete" underlying class (for example- for ProductProxy I would imagine it should return 'Product' –  sJhonny Apr 17 '11 at 8:42
    
The productProxy is a dynamic proxy class created by NHibernate, so I have no idea about the implementation.. I thought maybe someone with insight into how NHibernate creates proxies would be able to help.. Also GetType() is not virtual so seems to be that implementing it as "new" at the proxy class would not have any effect at all.. –  Can Gencer Apr 17 '11 at 9:23
    
I have the same book and I'm not a big fan of the Equals implementation that's provided. It relies too much on persistence of the objects. The book states that if either of the entities are transient (not saved to the db) then this Equals always returns false. Firstly I believe this breaks the persistence ignorance rule and secondly what if I want to check for equality prior to saving to the database. I implement part of this for efficiency (checking the ids) but I still implement a "logical" Equals for all my objects. –  brainimus Apr 20 '11 at 19:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I actually went ahead and wrote to the author of the book about this code. It turns out this is due to how the proxy wrapping works. Here is his response:

"If you don't understand how the proxy frameworks work, the idea can seem magical.

When NHibernate returns a proxy for the purposes of lazy loading, it returns a proxy instance inherited from the actual type. There are a few members we can access without forcing a load from the database. Among these are proxy's Id property or field, GetType(), and in some circumstances Equals() and GetHashCode(). Accessing any other member will force a load from the database.

When that happens, the proxy creates an internal instance. So, for example, a lazy loaded instance of Customer (CustomerProxy102987098721340978), when loaded, will internally create a new Customer instance with all of the data from the database. The proxy then does something like this:

public overrides string Name 
{ 
    get { 
       return _loadedInstance.Name; 
    } 
    set { _loadedInstance.Name = value; } 
}

Incidentally, it's this overriding that requires everything to be virtual on entities that allow lazy loaded.

So, all calls to the Name property on the proxy are relayed to the internal Customer instance that has the actual data.

GetUnproxiedType() takes advantage of this. A simple call to GetType() on the proxy will return typeof(CustomerProxy02139487509812340). A call to GetUnproxiedType() will be relayed to the internal customer instance, and the internal customer instance will return typeof(Customer)."

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Does this mean that simply comparing two proxied entities will cause them to be loaded from the database, even though no DB fields are used in the comparison, except the Id -- which we already know? –  Victor Grigoriu Jul 14 '11 at 17:05
1  
@Victor, yes it does that. You can test it by loading the objects with Session.Load(). I tested around a bit and it seems to do that as soon you as you write any overload of Equals(), even if it just returns true/false. –  Can Gencer Jul 14 '11 at 22:16

We use NH 2 and this example did not work for us. (It FAILED to unproxy the type and left proxy type, see below). It said that 2 entities with the same id are not equal, when one of them is proxy(of COrganization) and other is not(DOrganization). When we had a hierarchy:

class Organization
class AOrganization : Organization
class COrganization : Organization
{
  public virtual COrganization GetConcrete()
  {
    return null;
  }
}

class DOrganization : COrganization
{
  public virtual COrganization GetConcrete()
  {
    return this;
  }
}

AOrganization aOrganization;
COrganization cOrganization;
contract = new CContract(aOrganization, cOrganization as COrganization); //(COrganization)(cOrganization.GetConcrete()),

So CContract has a field of type COrganization. With a setter

public class Contract: Entity <short>
{
    public virtual COrganization COrganization
    {
        get { return cOrganization; }
        protected internal set
        {
            if (cOrganization != null && value != cOrganization) // != calls ==, which calls Equals, which calls GetUnproxiedType()
                    throw new Exception("Changing organization is not allowed.");
            }
            cOrganization = value;
        }
    }
    private COrganization cOrganization;
}

We constructed new Contract, its constructor set the COrganization field pointing to some organization. Then we called UnitOfWork.Commit, NH tried to set COrganization field again (with the same id), GetUnproxiedType worked incorrectly, new and old values were recognized as non-equal, and exception was thrown...

Here is the place where error showed up:

            var otherType = other.GetUnproxiedType();
            var thisType = GetUnproxiedType();

            return thisType.IsAssignableFrom(otherType) ||
            otherType.IsAssignableFrom(thisType);

In debugger: otherType == COrganizationProxy - GetUnproxiedType failed... thisType == DOrganization

COrganizationProxy and DOrganization both inherit COrganization. So they are not IsAssignableFrom for each other...

Why does this example work for you?

Maybe because we have NH 2.0 or 2.1?

Or because of simple "cOrganization as COrganization" instead of "(COrganization)(cOrganization.GetConcrete())"?

Or because we have implementation of ==, != and Equals not only in Entity, but in Organization too?

public abstract class Organization : Entity<int>
{
    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return base.Equals(obj);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return base.GetHashCode();
    }

    public static bool operator ==(Organization object1, Organization object2)
    {
        return AreEqual(object1, object2);
    }

    public static bool operator !=(Organization object1, Organization object2)
    {
        return AreNotEqual(object1, object2);
    }
}

public abstract class Entity<TId>
{
    public virtual TId Id { get; /*protected*/ set; }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return Equals(obj as Entity<TId>);
    }

    private static bool IsTransient(Entity<TId> obj)
    {
        return obj != null &&
        Equals(obj.Id, default(TId));
    }

    private Type GetUnproxiedType()
    {
        return GetType();
    }

    public virtual bool Equals(Entity<TId> other)
    {
        if (other == null)
            return false;
        if (ReferenceEquals(this, other))
            return true;
        if (!IsTransient(this) &&
        !IsTransient(other) &&
        Equals(Id, other.Id))
        {
            var otherType = other.GetUnproxiedType();
            var thisType = GetUnproxiedType();
            return thisType.IsAssignableFrom(otherType) ||
            otherType.IsAssignableFrom(thisType);
        }
        return false;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        if (Equals(Id, default(TId)))
            return base.GetHashCode();
        return Id.GetHashCode();
    }

    /// This method added by me
    /// For == overloading
    protected static bool AreEqual<TEntity>(TEntity entity1, TEntity entity2)
    {
        if ((object)entity1 == null)
        {
            return ((object)entity2 == null);
        }
        else
        {
            return entity1.Equals(entity2);
        }
    }

    /// This method added by me
    /// For != overloading
    protected static bool AreNotEqual<TEntity>(TEntity entity1, TEntity entity2)
    {
        return !AreEqual(entity1, entity2);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Strangely when I changed "private Type GetUnproxiedType()" from the book to "public virtual Type GetUnproxiedType()" all started to work (NH 2.0 or 2.1 we have). Why do we have "private" method in the book? –  NHusser Jun 10 '11 at 14:18
    
could it be that it's proxying only public methods? I haven't tested this code either, not yet, so can't confirm if it works in NH 3.0 (Which is where the book is aimed at). –  Can Gencer Jun 10 '11 at 21:12
    
It depends on proxy factory we are using. groups.google.com/group/nhusers/browse_thread/thread/… –  NHusser Aug 27 '11 at 9:47

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