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I have a question in regards to when a PL/SQL trigger fires.

I've written the following trigger

CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER gradeInputCheck
BEFORE INSERT ON GRADE 
FOR EACH ROW
DECLARE
  newGrade GRADE.NUMERIC_GRADE%TYPE := :NEW.NUMERIC_GRADE;
    grade_too_low EXCEPTION;
    grade_too_high EXCEPTION;
BEGIN
  DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(newGrade);
    IF (newGrade < 0) THEN
        RAISE grade_too_low;
    ELSIF (newGrade > 100) THEN
        RAISE grade_too_high;
    END IF;
EXCEPTION
    WHEN grade_too_low THEN
        DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('Grades must be between 0 and 100');
    WHEN grade_too_high THEN
        DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('Grades must be between 0 and 100');
END;

However, when I run a simple statement like

UPDATE grade SET numeric_grade = -1;

The trigger doesn't fire. Any points on how I can make the trigger fire?

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

Your trigger is an insert trigger. Insert triggers do not fire for update statements. You should use something like this instead:

BEFORE UPDATE ON GRADE
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Ha! I'm an idiot for for forgetting that. Thank you! –  user711330 Apr 16 '11 at 16:56

Also:

  1. The trigger will not prevent the update since you catch the exception within the trigger itself and never re-raise it, and,
  2. Unless you're using a "client" that "sees" and is looking for DBMS_OUTPUT (and many don't), you won't even see the DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE output.

To address both of these concerns, you could:

  1. Remove the exception block altogether, and,
  2. Use RAISE_APPLICATION_ERROR (with your custom error message) instead of RAISE.

However, for relatively simple constraints like these, there are good arguments for using a CHECK constraint instead of a trigger, like performance, correctness, maintainability, and "declarativeness".

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+1. Nice points. Appreciate it. –  Guru Apr 16 '11 at 17:41
    
I vow to use "declarativeness" in all future software documentation. –  Clever Idea Widgetry Jul 16 '13 at 18:57

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