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A question has rised in my project team as we are designing a web page. Can we use white characters (like space) in the name attribute of an HTML element ? eg. <input type="checkbox" name="first check box">

My concern is mainly the behavior of different browsers with such an attribute value.

We are now in the design phase, until we get to write some code and test this, a long time will pass, so I am asking you experts about this.

Thank you !

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marked as duplicate by Alma Do, HamZa, vascowhite, andrewsi, Jonesy May 5 at 2:22

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3  
You can write code while designing. –  Don Roby Apr 16 '11 at 17:17
    
Why would you have to wait a long time to test this? –  ceejayoz Apr 16 '11 at 17:18
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

No.

http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/types.html#type-name

ID and NAME tokens must begin with a letter ([A-Za-z]) and may be followed by any number of letters, digits ([0-9]), hyphens ("-"), underscores ("_"), colons (":"), and periods (".").

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3  
You link to the CDATA section but then you quote from the ID and NAME token section that appears after it (ID and NAME says no, but CDATA says YES). –  Quentin Apr 16 '11 at 17:21
    
Updated link to point directly to name section. –  todd Jan 4 '13 at 22:52
2  
The name attribute takes a CDATA token, not a NAME token. –  Quentin Feb 15 '13 at 11:18
    
Link to name attribute being a CDATA: w3.org/TR/html401/struct/links.html#adef-name-A –  divieira Jul 26 '13 at 4:51
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Yes.

The name attribute contains CDATA. It can be more or less anything you like.

Note that name attributes do not have NAME tokens as their data type (although the id attribute does (the id attribute doesn't take an ID token)), so you don't have the restrictions imposed on NAME tokens.

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Nope. w3.org/TR/html401/types.html#type-cdata –  ceejayoz Apr 16 '11 at 17:19
    
+1 @David is correct as pointed out by @preinheimer: w3.org/TR/html401/interact/forms.html name CDATA #IMPLIED -- name of form for scripting Learned something, thanks. –  Pekka 웃 Apr 16 '11 at 17:21
    
Yup. "CDATA is a sequence of characters from the document character set and may include character entities." –  Quentin Apr 16 '11 at 17:22
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Most browsers will handle this fine, as long as they are properly quoted. However, for sake of eliminating corner cases, it's much wiser to user CamelCase and avoid the probability of browsers not handling it correctly.

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What browser fails to handle it correctly? (I prefer to avoid hacking around unconfirmed bugs in unspecified browsers when the spec says what I want to do is fine) –  Quentin Apr 16 '11 at 17:26
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