Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am creating a service that receives requests in the form of JSON messages. I need to parse the message and take the appropriate action based on the request type. For example (in pseudo code):

switch(request.type) {
    case "NewOrder":
        createNewOrder(order);
        break;
    case "CancelOrder"
        cancelOrder(orderId);
        break;
}

It seems that most JSON APIs (at least those that do the object mapping for you) need the root object type to deserialize. Is there any elegant way around this?

As an example, in the Jackson API (using full object mapping), I need to call the mapper as follows:

NewOrder newOrder = mapper.readValue(src, NewOrder.class);
CancelOrder cancelOrder = mapper.readValue(src. CancelOrder.class);

Which means that I need to know the object's class even before I have parsed it. What I really need is some way to peek into the JSON string, determine the request type and then call the appropriate readValue() method - something like this:

String requestType = getRequestType(src);
switch(request.type) {
    case "NewOrder":
        NewOrder newOrder = mapper.readValue(src, NewOrder.class);
        createNewOrder(newOrder.order);
        break;
    case "CancelOrder"
        CancelOrder cancelOrder = mapper.readValue(src. CancelOrder.class);
        cancelOrder(cancelOrder.orderId);
        break;
}

Is it possible to do this using Jackson or any other Java JSON parser? I am sure I can go to a lower level and use a streaming API or a node based API, but trying to avoid that complexity if I can.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you use Jackson to parse the JSON input into a Map, you can quickly access the type information. You can then create the object as the required class and use ObjectMapper.convert to configure the object from the Map you got from Jackson.

Here is an example:

public class Test1 {
private String f;
private String b;

public void setFoo(String v) { f = v; }

public void setBim(String v) { b = v; }

public String toString() { return "f=" + f + ", b=" + b; }


public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    String test = "{ \"foo\":\"bar\", \"bim\":\"baz\" }";
    ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
    HashMap map = mapper.readValue(new StringReader(test), HashMap.class);
    System.out.println(map);
    Test1 test1 = mapper.convertValue(map, Test1.class);
    System.out.println(test1);
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just started on Jackson, so follow up question is what Jackson API to use for creating the MAP - is that their streaming API or the Tree Model API. Also, if Jackson has gone through the trouble of creating the map, can I peek into the request type and hand the remainder of the map to Jackson to construct the "wrapped" object - instead of using BeanUtils? –  Naresh Apr 16 '11 at 18:24
    
Yes you can! I've edited my answer to show an example. –  Simon G. Apr 16 '11 at 21:29
    
Awesome - this should work for me! In the meanwhile I worked out a solution on similar lines. Will post shortly. The only difference is that I read in a tree of JsonNode's instead of a HashMap. –  Naresh Apr 16 '11 at 21:54

You could use a wrapper around your order:

{
"NewOrder": {...}
}

or

{
"CancelOrder": {...}
}

UPDATE:

class Wrapper {
    newOrder: NewOrder;
    cancelOrderId: Integer;
}

Wrapper wrapper = mapper.readValue(src, Wrapper.class);

if (wrapper.newOrder != null) {
    createNewOrder(wrapper.newOrder);
}
if (wrapper.cancelOrderId != null) {
    cancelOrder(wrapper.cancelOrderId);
}
share|improve this answer
    
How does the wrapper help me with this issue? Note that the content of the NewOrder request is a full order whereas the content of the CancelOrder request is just an order id. In general, the requests could have very different content. For example, another request might be SubmitUserProfile which contains a user profile. –  Naresh Apr 16 '11 at 18:21
    
I have completed my response –  Maurice Perry Apr 17 '11 at 7:29
    
Ah I see! So the wrapper wraps all possible requests (sort of like a union) and (generally) only one of them will be not null. Nice pattern - I will have to remember that. Thanks Maurice. –  Naresh Apr 17 '11 at 14:45

Assuming the Order is just data, delegating responsibility to a DoSomethingService and producing the service via a factory might help:

Service service = takeActionFactory
    .buildTheRightServiceForTheValue(src);
service.takeAction();

The factory would parse the JSON object:

Service buildTheRightServiceForTheValue(src) {
    switch(request.type) {
    case "NewOrder":
        return new NewOrderService(mapper.readValue(src, NewOrder.class)); 
        break;
    case "CancelOrder"
        return new CancelOrderService(mapper.readValue(src. CancelOrder.class));
        break;
    }
    case "SomeOtherObject"
        return new SomeOtherService(mapper.readValue(src, SomeOtherService.class));
    }

And the concrete services are sub-classes of Service:

NewOrderService implements Service {
    private final NewOrder newOrder;
    /**constructor*/
    ...

    void takeAction() {
        createNewOrder(newOrder.order);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I definitely get your service idea (it's the Command pattern), but the problem lies in "switch(request.type)". Since the request type is embedded in the request itself (i.e. the src), it is not available until src has been parsed (at least partially). –  Naresh Apr 16 '11 at 19:10
    
Ah ok. In that case I don't know enough about Jackson to help. I wonder though if the problem lies a bit higher up and consequently the service has too much responsibility. If you could have a different URL or request parameter to distinguish between different events that might help. Otherwise the answer by Maurice Perry would also be of use: some additional type information in the JSON message could be passed along (type name or something) that helps decide the action to do. –  nzroller Apr 16 '11 at 19:30
    
I have a few ideas after reading all your responses (yours, Simon's and Perry's). Working on a solution. I will post when I have something reasonable. –  Naresh Apr 16 '11 at 20:54

Thanks Maurice, Simon and nzroller. Combining ideas from all your responses here's the solution I came up with. Feedback welcome.

public enum MessageType {
    NewOrder,
    CancelOrder
}

public class JsonMessage {
    private MessageType messageType;
    private Object payload;
    ...
}

public class Order {
    private String orderId;
    private String itemId;
    private int quantity;
    ...
}

public class NewOrder {
    private Order order;
    ...
}

public class CancelOrder {
    private String orderId;
    ...
}

Here's how to serialize a NewOrder:

JsonMessage jsonMessage =
    new JsonMessage(MessageType.NewOrder, newOrder);
ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
String jsonMessageString = mapper.writeValueAsString(jsonMessage);

To deserialize, I first read the JSON string into a tree of JsonNode's. I then read the messageType. Finally, based on the message type, I read the payload directly as a Java object.

JsonNode rootNode = mapper.readValue(jsonMessageString, JsonNode.class);

MessageType messageType =
    MessageType.valueOf(rootNode.path("messageType").getTextValue());

switch(messageType) {
    case NewOrder:
        NewOrder newOrder = mapper.readValue(
                rootNode.path("payload"), NewOrder.class);
        myOrderService.placeOrder(newOrder.getOrder());
        break;

    case CancelOrder:
        CancelOrder cancelOrder = mapper.readValue(
                rootNode.path("payload"), CancelOrder.class);
        myOrderService.cancelOrder(cancelOrder.getOrderId());
        break;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.