Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm looking for a LINQ query that will select only those objects whose date interval is not higher than 20 seconds. For example:

AuthenticationEssay[] essays = new AuthenticationEssay[] {
    new AuthenticationEssay() { Date = DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(20), Success = false },
    new AuthenticationEssay() { Date = DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(24), Success = false },
    new AuthenticationEssay() { Date = DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(29), Success = false },
    new AuthenticationEssay() { Date = DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(38), Success = false },
    new AuthenticationEssay() { Date = DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(125), Success = false },
    new AuthenticationEssay() { Date = DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(347), Success = false },
    new AuthenticationEssay() { Date = DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(400), Success = false },
    new AuthenticationEssay() { Date = DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(422), Success = false },
    new AuthenticationEssay() { Date = DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(446), Success = false },
    new AuthenticationEssay() { Date = DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(467), Success = false }
};

I want to select only the first occurence of those objects whose date interval is not longer than 20 seconds against the next object. In this case, the query should return only the first 4 objects. Any idea? :(

UPDATE

Sorry, I forgot to mention that I'm sorting the array by descending order. So yes, the position in the array shouldn't have any effect on the query.

share|improve this question
    
If the last item were AddSeconds(465) instead, would it be included? –  Kirk Woll Apr 16 '11 at 19:14
1  
What do you mean the date interval is not higher than 20 seconds? Do you mean the difference between DateTime.Now and essay[i].Date? Do you mean between essay[0] and essay[1]? –  mfanto Apr 16 '11 at 19:14
    
I mean between essay[0] and essay[1]. But before I make some comparasion, I'm sorting the array –  Davita Apr 16 '11 at 19:26
    
Can you give an example of the expected output? –  Thomas Levesque Apr 16 '11 at 20:01

3 Answers 3

What about this?

var query from i in Enumerable.Range(1, count - 1)
          let current = list[i]
          let previous = list[i - 1]
          // I see some empty positions in your example, nullability check
          where current != null && previous != null
          where (current.Date - previous.Date).TotalSeconds < 20
          select previous;

EDIT: Obviously you have to call First() in order to get only the first element of the sequence.

query.First();

EDIT 2: I have just read you are ordering your results descending. In this case the query will be slightly different:

var query from i in Enumerable.Range(1, count - 1)
          let current = list[i]
          let previous = list[i - 1]
          // I see some empty positions in your example, nullability check
          where current != null && previous != null
          where (previous.Date - current.Date).TotalSeconds < 20
          select current;
share|improve this answer
    
Nope, doesn't work. It returns too many objects which shouldn't be in the list –  Davita Apr 16 '11 at 19:38
    
If you want just the first element, call First() method on this LINQ query. –  as-cii Apr 16 '11 at 19:40
    
Thanks, but I know how to get first occurence of element. What I want is to get first occurence of elements whose date interval is no longer than 20 seconds. –  Davita Apr 16 '11 at 19:49
    
Why doesn't my example work? –  as-cii Apr 16 '11 at 19:53

It ain't pretty, but here you go...

var result = Enumerable.Range(0, essays.Count() - 1)
    .Select(i => new {Essays1 = essays[i], Essays2 = essays[i + 1]})
    .Where(a => a.Essays2 != null)
    .Where(a => a.Essays2.Date - a.Essays1.Date < new TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 20))
    .Select(a => a.Essays1);

Does it have to be LINQ? I love LINQ, but I think something like this would be more readable...

var result = new List<AuthenticationEssay>();
for (var i = 0; i < (essays.Count() - 1); i++)
{
    if (essays[i + 1] != null)
        if (essays[i + 1].Date - essays[i].Date < new TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 20))
            result.Add(essays[i]);
}
share|improve this answer

It is probably possible to do it using built-in Linq operators, but in this case I think writing a specific method is easier. You could do something like that:

static IEnumerable<AuthenticationEssay> Filter(IEnumerable<AuthenticationEssay> list)
{
    AuthenticationEssay last = null;
    AuthenticationEssay previous = null;
    foreach(var item in list)
    {
        if (last == null)
        {
            // Always return the first item
            yield return item;
        }
        else if ((item.Date - last.Date).TotalSeconds >= 20)
        {
           yield return item;
        }

        previous = last;
        last = item;
    }
    if (previous != null && last != null && (last.Date - previous.Date).TotalSeconds <= 20)
       yield return last;
}

Of course it would be possible to make it more reusable, by making the method generic and passing a predicate as a parameter, but since it's a very specific requirement, I'm not sure it would be very useful...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.