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I want to validate an input string against a regular expression and then split it.

The input string can be any combination of the letter A and letter A followed by an exclamation mark. For example these are valid input strings: A, A!, AA, AA!, A!A, A!A!, AAA, AAA!, AA!A, A!AA, ... Any other characters should yield an invalid match.

My code would probably look something like this:

public string[] SplitString(string s)
{
    Regex regex = new Regex(@"...");
    if (!regex.IsMatch(s))
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("Wrong input string!");
    }

    return regex.Split(s);
}

How should my regex look like?

Edit - some examples:

  • input string "AAA", function should return an array of 3 strings ("A", "A", "A")
  • input string "A!AAA!", function should return an array of 4 strings ("A!", "A", "A", "A!")
  • input string "AA!b", function should throw an ArgumentException
share|improve this question
    
Are you sure this isn't homework? – James Allen Apr 16 '11 at 19:30
    
@James - and suppose it is, still a valid question. Anyway, such "meta" tags are discouraged. – Oded Apr 16 '11 at 19:32
    
Why would you use regex for that, sounds like overkill – H.B. Apr 16 '11 at 19:33
    
@James - yeah, I'm sure. @H.B. - this is a simplified example, there could be more different letters, but each of them should be either alone or with exclamation mark at the end. – sventevit Apr 16 '11 at 19:35
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Doesn't seem like a Regex is a good plan here. Have a look at this:

private bool ValidString(string myString)
{
    char[] validChars = new char[] { 'A', '!' };
    if (!myString.StartsWith("A"))
        return false;
    if (myString.Contains("!!"))
        return false;
    foreach (char c in myString)
    {
        if (!validChars.Contains(c))
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}

private List<string> SplitMyString(string myString)
{
    List<string> resultList = new List<string>();
    if (ValidString(myString))
    {
        string resultString = "";
        foreach (char c in myString)
        {
            if (c == 'A')
                resultString += c;
            if (c == '!')
            {
                resultString += c;
                resultList.Add(string.Copy(resultString));
                resultString = "";
            }
        }
    }
    return resultList;
}

The reason for Regex not being a good plan is that you can write the logic out in a few simple if-statements that compile and function a lot faster and cheaper. Also Regex isn't so good at repeating patterns for an unlimited length string. You'll either end up writing a long Regex or something illegible.

EDIT At the end of my code you will either have a List<string> with the split input string like in your question. Or an empty List<string>. You can adjust it a little to throw an ArgumentException if that requirement is very important to you. Alternatively you can do a Count on the list to see if it was successful.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah Regex may not be efficient for everything, but here A! can occur but not A!! or something like that. Your solution doesn't make that consideration. – manojlds Apr 16 '11 at 19:45
    
@manojlds Fair enough, let me solve that .. hang on. One more little if. I reckon Regex is still slower here. – Bazzz Apr 16 '11 at 19:46
    
i thought that with regex I could simplify things, not complicate them :) – sventevit Apr 16 '11 at 19:49
    
@_simon_ perhaps you can, but I'm curious what pattern you'll come up with. Personally I think Regex almost always makes things more complicated because it is hard to read (compared to a few if-statements). But if you can find a simple regex that does what you are after, then I'm curious to see it, and I will stand corrected. – Bazzz Apr 16 '11 at 19:52
 Regex regex = new Regex(@"^(A!|A)+$");   

Edit:

Use something like http://gskinner.com/RegExr/ to play with Regular Expressions

Edit after comment:

Ok, you have made it a bit more clear what you want. Don't approach it like that. Because in what you are doing, you cannot expect to match the entire input and then split as it would be the entire input. Either use separate regular expression for the split part, or use groups to get the matched values.

Example:

        //Initial match part

        Regex regex2 = new Regex(@"(A!)|(A)");

        return regex2.Split(s);

And again, regular expressions are not always the answer. See how this might impact your application.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work. Input string: "AAA!AA", regex.Split returns only one A instead of array A, A, A!, A, A. – sventevit Apr 16 '11 at 19:45
    
Ok, edits in line to account for that. – manojlds Apr 16 '11 at 20:16

You could try something like:

Regex regex = new Regex(@"^[A!]+$");
share|improve this answer
    
Nope A!!A would be valid which is not the case – manojlds Apr 16 '11 at 19:40
    
Also, input string "AAA!AA", regex.Split returns 2 empty strings instead of an array "A", "A", "A!", "A", "A". – sventevit Apr 16 '11 at 19:51

((A+!?)+)

Try looking at Espresso http://www.ultrapico.com/Expresso.htm or Rad Software Regular Expression Designer http://www.radsoftware.com.au/regexdesigner/ for designing and testing RE's.

share|improve this answer
    
Nope, something like A!B would still match. – manojlds Apr 16 '11 at 19:42
    
Also, input string "AAA!AA", regex.Split returns 4 items ("", "AAA!AA", "AA", "") instead of an array "A", "A", "A!", "A", "A". – sventevit Apr 16 '11 at 19:48
    
@_simon_. While @manojlds is correct in that mine will pick up the A! part of A!B I need some clarification also. You said you want to validate an input string and split it. Does the string being validated contain the A! string variants along with other data or is it exclusively the "A!" string variants and if it contains anything else then none of the string is valid? (Ex. "This is A! test.") – Jim Apr 16 '11 at 19:51
    
Please see my edit, I added some examples for clarification. – sventevit Apr 16 '11 at 19:55

I think I have a solution that satisfies all examples. I've had to break it into two regular expressions (which I don't like)...

public string[] SplitString(string s)
{
  Regex regex = new Regex(@"^[A!]+$");
  if (!regex.IsMatch(s))
  {
      throw new ArgumentException("Wrong input string!");
  } 
  return Regex.Split(s, @"(A!?)").Where(x => !string.IsNullOrEmpty(x)).ToArray();
}

Note the use of linq - required to remove the empty matches.

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