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I need to call SetSettings() and using the 3 elements in splitSettings, set EncodeAudio to False. How would I go about doing that? Convert the property of a object to who's name I have in a string. I realize I could do with with a switch statement of all my settings but there has to be a more dynamic way to go about doing this.

namespace SettingsLib
{
  public class Settings
  {
    public Boolean EncodeAudio { get; set; }
  }
}
namespace Service
{
   void SetSettings()
   {
     string[] splitSettings = { "SettingsLib.Settings", "EncodeAudio", "False" };
     // Need to set EncodeAudio to False in SettingsLib.Settings
   }
}

Yes I have a instance of Settings

Say:

Settings settingManager = new Settings();

I am trying to do is dynamically set EncodeAudo to False by using elements of splitSettings

settingManager.EncodeAudio = False;

Thanks to the help of TBohnen.jnr I came to this answer:

public void setProperty(object containingObject, string propertyName, object newValue)
{
    foreach (PropertyInfo p in containingObject.GetType().GetProperties())
    {
        if (p.Name == propertyName)
        {
            p.SetValue(containingObject, Convert.ChangeType(newValue, p.PropertyType), null);
        }
    }
}
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1  
Do you have an instance of your Settings object somewhere? It doesn't make sense to try to do this if you don't. Dynamically trying to create an instance of that object by name would be doable. Is that what you are trying to do? –  Jeff Mercado Apr 16 '11 at 19:39
    
Or should the EncodeAudio method be static maybe? –  Joce Apr 16 '11 at 19:50
    
Even if it is static, how do I find what property to use from its name as a string? –  jpiccolo Apr 16 '11 at 19:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

EDIT Tested it with int, bool, double and string and it worked, also added a check to make sure that the property exists and throws an exception of it doesn't (Might want to change Exception type)

EDIT 2: Temporary solution, will add more typenames to the convert method or alternatively if somebody can suggest a more dynamic way of casting it (If not then I assume you will have to know all of the types that will be used)?

EDIT3 Stole the convert method from another answer in question (Chris Taylor ), thanks :-)

public void setProperty(object containingObject, string propertyName, object newValue)
    {
        if (containingObject.GetType().GetProperties().Count(c => c.Name == propertyName) > 0)
        {
            var type = containingObject.GetType().GetProperties().First(c => c.Name == propertyName).PropertyType;
            object val = Convert(type,(string)newValue);
            containingObject.GetType().InvokeMember(propertyName, BindingFlags.SetProperty, null, containingObject, new object[] { val });
        }
        else
        {
            throw new KeyNotFoundException("The property: " + propertyName + " was not found in: " + containingObject.GetType().Name);
        }
    }

    public object convert(System.Type type, string value)
    {
        return Convert.ChangeType(value, type);

    }

Taken from http://www.haslo.ch/blog/setproperty-and-getproperty-with-c-reflection/

Was interested to see if this works, create a quick test:

class testSettings
{
    public bool SetBool { get; set; }

    public void setProperty(object containingObject, string propertyName, object newValue) 
    {
         if (containingObject.GetType().GetProperties().Count(c => c.Name == propertyName) > 0)
        {
            containingObject.GetType().InvokeMember(propertyName, BindingFlags.SetProperty, null, containingObject, new object[] { newValue });
        }
        else
        {
            throw new KeyNotFoundException("The property: " + propertyName + " was not found in: " + containingObject.GetType().Name);
        }
    }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    testSettings ts = new testSettings();
    ts.SetBool = false;
    ts.setProperty(ts, "SetBool", true);
    Console.WriteLine(ts.SetBool.ToString());
    Console.Read();
}

The output is true, not entirely sure if it will convert all types correctly though.

share|improve this answer
    
This is on the right track but still not complete, you are passing bool true, I am passing "true" which doesn't work. ts.setProperty(ts, "SetBool", "true"); fails with a System.MissingMethodException. Now I guess I have to convert the string to of the value to the correct type. –  jpiccolo Apr 16 '11 at 20:46
    
@jpiccolo add the convert method and changes to setProperty, should work now... –  TBohnen.jnr Apr 16 '11 at 21:14
    
yeah, I was working on this and came to the same solution: public void setProperty(object containingObject, string propertyName, object newValue) { foreach (PropertyInfo p in containingObject.GetType().GetProperties()) { if (p.Name == propertyName) { p.SetValue(containingObject, Convert.ChangeType(newValue, p.PropertyType), null); } } } –  jpiccolo Apr 16 '11 at 21:16

As others have mentioned, you should consider making your SettingsLib class static. And you might also need to handle the conversion of values from strings to the target types. Here is a simple example how this would work.

namespace Service
{
  class Program
  {
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
      string[] splitSettings = { "SettingsLib.Settings", "EncodeAudio", "False" };
      SetProperty(splitSettings[0], splitSettings[1], splitSettings[2]);  
    }

    static void SetProperty(string typeName, string propertyName, object value)
    {
      var type = Type.GetType(typeName);
      if (type == null) 
      {
        throw new ArgumentException("Unable to get type", "typeName");
      }

      var pi = type.GetProperty(propertyName);
      if (pi == null) 
      {
        throw new ArgumentException("Unable to find property on type", "propertyName");
      }

      object propertyValue = value;

      if (propertyValue != null)
      {
        // You might need more elaborate testing here to ensure that you can handle 
        // all the various types, you might need to special case some types here 
        // but this will work for the basics.
        if (pi.PropertyType != propertyValue.GetType())
        {
          propertyValue = Convert.ChangeType(propertyValue, pi.PropertyType);
        }
      }

      pi.SetValue(null, propertyValue, null);
    }
  }
}

namespace SettingsLib
{
  public static class Settings
  {
    public static bool EncodeAudio { get; set; }    
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Type.GetType(typeName) always seems to return null. Even with the class Settings and the property being static. –  jpiccolo Apr 16 '11 at 20:57
    
Thanks for the Convert.ChangeType, this would have saved me some time in the past :-) –  TBohnen.jnr Apr 16 '11 at 21:21
    
@jpiccolo, if the GetType(typeName) is returning null that means that the type name you are passing does not match the name of the type that you are trying to access. You can use ILDASM or Reflector to check that you are using the correct name. –  Chris Taylor Apr 17 '11 at 8:12

Maybe you should mark your settable properties as static and then try to set the values using Reflection:

namespace SettingsLib
{
  public static class Settings
  {
    public static bool EncodeAudio { get; set; }
  }
}
namespace Service
{
   void SetSettings()
   {
     string[] splitSettings = { "SettingsLib.Settings", "EncodeAudio", "False" };
     dynamic property = Type.GetType(splitSettings[0]).GetProperty(splitSettings[1]);
     property = splitSettings[2];
   }
}
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