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A class can be extended in Objective C using a category such as:

@interface NSString (CategoryName)
-(NSString *)myFabulousAddition;  // a fabulous additional method
@end

/////////////////////////////
@implementation NSString (CategoryName)

-(NSString *)myFabulousAddition {
    // do something fabulous...

}
@end

In this small example, I would be adding the method myFabulousAddition to NSString. I could then call it by [anNSString myFabulousAddition] just as if it were part of the NSString set of methods. Great and useful.

In the Apple documents regarding Categories, the docs state:

There’s no limit to the number of categories that you can add to a class, but each category name must be different, and each should declare and define a different set of methods.

What if you have something like this:

@interface NSString (CategoryName)
-(NSString *)myFabulousAddition;  // a fabulous additional method
@end

@interface NSString (ANOTHERCategoryName)
-(NSString *)myFabulousAddition;  // a DIFFERENT fabulous additional method 
                                  // BUT with same name as the other category
@end


/////////////////////////////

@implementation NSString (CategoryName)

-(NSString *)myFabulousAddition {
    // do something fabulous...

}
@end
@implementation NSString (ANOTHERCategoryName)

-(NSString *)myFabulousAddition {
    // do something equally fabulous, but DIFFERENT...

}
@end

The lack of a name in the parenthesis indicates that the form is an extension to the class, like so:

@interface MyObject ()   // No name -- an extension vs category to MyObject
- (void)setNumber:(NSNumber *)newNumber;
@end

Does the category name have any meaning to the compiler or linker? Is the category name part of the method signature in anyway or is it part of a primitive namespace? If the category name is meaningless, how do you know if you are about to stomp on another method and get undefined behavior?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The way to avoid stomping on methods is to prefix your category method names, like this:

@interface NSString (MyCompanyCategoryName)

- (NSString *)MYCO_fabulousAddition;

@end

If you get a collision of method names from different categories, then which one 'wins' at run time is completely undefined.

The name of a category is almost entirely useless, with the exception being that the nameless category (i.e. ()) is reserved for class extensions. Methods from class extensions are supposed to be implemented in the class' main @implementation.

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2  
Seems my only protection is SomeUniquePrefixForMyCompanyOrMeThatIsUglyFabulousMethod which just adds to the repetitive stress syndrome on my poor fingers... Thanks! –  the wolf Apr 16 '11 at 19:56
    
And actually adding prefixes to the methods you are adding with a category is also recommended by Apple ... –  Moszi Apr 16 '11 at 20:05
1  
@carrot-top that would be true if Xcode didn't offer code completion. –  user23743 Apr 18 '11 at 8:19
    
Adding prefixes is definitely the way to go … and yet I'll never do it. I find it so esthetically displeasing that I'll take my chances. In 10 years of writing Objective-C, I've never once found it to be a problem. And there's always OBJC_PRINT_REPLACED_METHODS. –  Gregory Higley Dec 29 '12 at 23:08

The category name doesn't mean anything special, it's just an identifier. Unless the linker (or runtime loader) decides to give you a warning, there is no way to tell that multiple categories are defining the same method.

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The behavior is (largely) unpredictable - one of the categories will win out, but you can't tell which one. Also, I think it's well possible you will start out with one implementation and end up with another one (if the second category is loaded after the first).

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1  
developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/… says "A framework-defined method you try to override may itself have been implemented in a category, and so which implementation takes precedence is not defined." –  Steven Kramer Apr 16 '11 at 19:46

i believe that they don't have any meaning. You don't really use them in your code ... Since they are categories and ... the semantic of a category ... is just to categorize something, i think this is somewhat logical ... I would say they just simply gather the methods ...

On the other hand your question is very valid ... You DON'T KNOW if you override a method. If you are in the same project then the compiler issues a warning (or an error ? i don't remember), however if you are overriding a method from a library, then .. you are out of luck ...

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My concern is more overriding the method of a third party library unintentionally. Let's say I add a third party or open source code that adds trim to NSString. Well I also have trim in my toolbox for NSString. Who's trim we going to be using? Undefined with no warning... Grrrr. –  the wolf Apr 16 '11 at 19:55
    
Unfortunately, Objective-C has a single name-space, which forces devs of third party libs to play games like adding a prefix to their categories that they hope will be (and remain) unique. I use my initials with an underscore and hope for the best (like Objective-C gets multiple namespaces sometime soon.) –  Rayfleck Apr 16 '11 at 19:59
    
Yes. that undefined ... i don't like this behavior either ... –  Moszi Apr 16 '11 at 20:01

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