Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following MSBuild project file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Project xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003" DefaultTargets="Deploy" ToolsVersion="4.0">
  <ItemGroup>
    <Base Include="$(MSBuildProjectDirectory)\.." />
  </ItemGroup>

  <PropertyGroup>
    <BaseDirectory>@(Base->'%(FullPath)')</BaseDirectory>
    <DeployDirectory>$(BaseDirectory)\Deploy</DeployDirectory>
    <Configuration>Release</Configuration>
  </PropertyGroup>

  <Target Name="Deploy" DependsOnTargets="Hello;Clean;Build" />

  <Target Name="Hello">
    <Message Text="Hello world. BaseDirectory=$(BaseDirectory), DeployDirectory=$(DeployDirectory)" />
  </Target>

  <Target Name="Clean">
    <RemoveDir Directories="$(DeployDirectory)" />
  </Target>

  <Target Name="Build">
    <MSBuild Projects="$(BaseDirectory)\DebugConsoleApp\DebugConsoleApp.csproj" Properties="Configuration=$(Configuration);OutputPath=$(DeployDirectory)" ContinueOnError="false" />
  </Target>

</Project>

And when I run it I get an error:

C:\Repositories\Project\Build\Build.proj(22,16): error MSB4012: The expression "@(Base->'%(FullPath)')\Deploy" cannot be used in this context. Item lists cannot be concatenated with other strings where an item lis t is expected. Use a semicolon to separate multiple item lists.

Why do I get this error and how can it be avoided? I use item Base within ItemGroup because I need to get rid of .. in path, and Items allow to do it via %FullPath metadata. If I use just PropertyGroup then everything works fine, but I have this .. in all paths.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

it is tough to tell exactly what is happening underneath the hood. I am not on the MSBuild so I am only loosly familiar with the actual implementation. We would need an MSBuild dev to chime in for a 100% correct answer. But here is what I'm assuming is happening (read: the remainder of this contains speculation on my part).

Inside you target when you use the statement

Projects="$(BaseDirectory)\DebugConsoleApp\DebugConsoleApp.csproj"

MSBuild notices that you have the property expansion $(BaseDirectory) used and that the parameter type for Projects on the MSBuild is an array. Also MSBuild notices that BaseDirectory is a property which contains an item. These properties do not behave like normal properties. You can think of them as "virtual properties" (yes I just made up that term). When these properties are used instead of looking up the value, there is a replacement made inline. So your Projects attribute changes to:

Projects="@(Base->'%(FullPath)')\DebugConsoleApp\DebugConsoleApp.csproj" 

Since Projects is an array MSBuild will attempt to perform a transformation on the expression provided. Since that is not a valid transformation an error occurs. Which is the error that you are receiving.

Now to work around this you can change you Build target to look like:

<Target Name="Build">
  <PropertyGroup>
    <_BaseDir>$(BaseDirectory)</_BaseDir>
    <_DeployDir>@(Base->'%(FullPath)')</_DeployDir>
  </PropertyGroup>

  <Message Text="_BaseDir: $(_BaseDir)"/>
  <Message Text="DeployDirectory: $(DeployDirectory)"/>

  <MSBuild Projects="$(_BaseDir)\DebugConsoleApp\DebugConsoleApp.csproj"
            Properties="Configuration=$(Configuration);OutputPath=$(_Tmp2)"
            ContinueOnError="false" />
  <!--<MSBuild Projects="$(BaseDirectory)\DebugConsoleApp\DebugConsoleApp.csproj" 
            Properties="Configuration=$(Configuration);OutputPath=$(DeployDirectory)" 
            ContinueOnError="false" />-->
</Target>

With this approach I have created a property group within the target itself and assigned the value of those "virtual properties" into new properties. Those new properties are not virtual properties, but real properties so you can use them as you expected with no issues.

Now on to your question, "why does the message task work WTF?!!!" Inside the Hello target you have the following:

<Message Text="Hello world. BaseDirectory=$(BaseDirectory), DeployDirectory=$(DeployDirectory)" />

Which works without no problems. Previously I mentioned that these virtual properties will essentially be replaced inline with the definition backing them, so this would in effect become.

<Message Text="Hello world. BaseDirectory=@(Base->'%(FullPath)'), DeployDirectory=@(Base->'%(FullPath)')\Deploy" />

OK hold that thought.

The Text property on the MSBuild task is defined as a string, which is a scalar value. If you recall the Projects property on the MSBuild task is defined as ITaskItem[], since this is an array its a vector value. When a @(...) is found within a vector values property the entire expression is used for as an item transformation. In this case the statement @(Base->'%(FullPath)')\DebugConsoleApp\DebugConsoleApp.csproj is not a valid transform expression. When a '@(..)' is found inside of a scalar values property declaration the values are flattened into a string. So each instance of '@(...)' is processed and flattened into a single string value. If there are multiple values then delimiters are used.

So hopefully that explains the behavior you are seeing, and it may actually be a bug. You can log it at http://connect.microsoft.com/ and the MSBuild team will triage it.

More on virtual properties Earlier I mentioned that these virtual properties do not behave like normal properties in the sense the the value is not looked up, but instead the usage of $(...) is replaced with the properties expression. Don't take my word for it, see it for yourself. Here is a sample file that I created

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Project xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003" ToolsVersion="4.0">
  <ItemGroup>
    <MyItem Include="C:\temp\01.txt"></MyItem>
  </ItemGroup>

  <PropertyGroup>
    <MyProperty>@(MyItem->'%(FullPath)')</MyProperty>
  </PropertyGroup>

  <Target Name="Demo">
    <Message Text="MyProperty: $(MyProperty)" />
    <!-- Add to the item -->
    <ItemGroup>
      <MyItem Include="C:\temp\01.txt"></MyItem>
    </ItemGroup>
    <Message Text="MyProperty: $(MyProperty)" />
  </Target>

</Project>

Here I have an item list MyItem declared and a dependent property MyProperty. Inside the Demo target I print the value for MyProperty then I add another value to the MyItem item list and print out the value for MyProperty again. Here is the result.

PS C:\temp\MSBuild\SO> msbuild .\Build.proj /nologo
Build started 4/26/2011 10:17:08 PM.
Project "C:\temp\MSBuild\SO\Build.proj" on node 1 (default targets).
First:
  MyProperty: C:\temp\01.txt
  MyProperty: C:\temp\01.txt;C:\temp\01.txt
Done Building Project "C:\temp\MSBuild\SO\Build.proj" (default targets).

As you can see it behaves in the way in which I stated.

share|improve this answer

You're fighting evaluation ordering. Move your property group declaration inside the "Hello" target and it will work the way you expect. Better yet, move it into its own target, and set that target in any DependsOnTargets for other targets that require the evaluation to be performed before they execute, or conversely, set those targets as the "BeforeTargets" for your new target.

(edit)

This will work for all targets:

<ItemGroup>
  <Base Include="$(MSBuildProjectDirectory)\.." />
</ItemGroup>

<Target Name="Deploy" DependsOnTargets="Hello;Clean;Build" />

<Target Name="CalcProps">
  <PropertyGroup>
    <BaseDirectory>@(Base->'%(FullPath)')</BaseDirectory>
    <DeployDirectory>$(BaseDirectory)\Deploy</DeployDirectory>
    <Configuration>Release</Configuration>
  </PropertyGroup>
</Target>

<Target Name="Hello" DependsOnTargets="CalcProps">
  <Message
    Text="Hello world. BaseDirectory=$(BaseDirectory), DeployDirectory=$(DeployDirectory)"
    />
</Target>

<Target Name="Clean" DependsOnTargets="CalcProps">
  <RemoveDir Directories="$(DeployDirectory)" />
</Target>

<Target Name="Build" DependsOnTargets="CalcProps">
  <MSBuild 
    Projects="$(BaseDirectory)\DebugConsoleApp\DebugConsoleApp.csproj" 
    Properties="Configuration=$(Configuration);OutputPath=$(DeployDirectory)" 
    ContinueOnError="false"
    />  
</Target>

I'd theorize that the evaluation of the Projects argument to the MSBuild task, since it is of type ITaskItem[], may be using the unevaluated string in $(BaseDirectory), and since it is an item transform, erroring out since in the case where the item being transformed has more than one member (even though in this case it doesn't). Your use of the same property in a Message task is being passed to an argument of type System.String, which may have a different evaluation sequence.

share|improve this answer
    
But the Hello target outputs everything correct, I see on the screen exactly what I expect to see. Why it works in Hello target and causes error in Build target? –  Dmitry Lobanov Apr 17 '11 at 12:41
    
Thanks, your suggestion was true, it works. Though I improved it a little bit: there's no necessity to calculate properties before each task, it is enough to do it only once per each "root" task, i.e. if I'm going to call Deploy target only then CalcProps can be put to DependsOnTargets attribute of Deploy task. The other tasks are being called from Deploy task and not directly from command line. –  Dmitry Lobanov Apr 17 '11 at 16:41
    
Actually, the way I have it written it will only calculate the properties one time. MSBuild won't run the target twice, it will only ensure it gets run once before whatever dependent target gets run first. You can verify this by putting a Message task in the CalcProps target, then calling /t:Deploy, the Message will only appear once. –  Brian Kretzler Apr 18 '11 at 0:39
    
Or, my concern was not about evaluating multiple times, I rather bother about need to specify target multiple times, I would like no to specify it at all or at least make it as rare as possible. –  Dmitry Lobanov Apr 18 '11 at 0:47
    
After all I used InitialTargets attribute of Project element to recalculate properties. InitialTargets attribute ensures that targets specified in it is executed before any task have been executed. –  Dmitry Lobanov Apr 29 '11 at 21:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.