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I'm designing a server system for my school's Student Government Association. It will grab data from a database made in Microsoft Access (including a picture, name, position, phone number, email, etc.) and send it to the client application, which will display it in a GUI. The server is running on Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal, which is why I'm using Java as opposed to C# which I'm much more experienced in. I'm debating whether to use the Access Database (which would be in an external hard drive connected via USB to the server computer), or Amazon SimpleDB. I don't, however, have any knowledge of SQL. Do you guys have any tutorials or tips on creating the server and client? Thanks in advance.

Jtahlborn: What do you mean by a "'normal' database"?

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how are you planning on connecting to your access database? an access database is not a "normal" database. there are not any free jdbc drivers for access databases. so, using an access database is going to make things very difficult from the start. –  jtahlborn Apr 16 '11 at 20:30
    
You can use C# on Linux using Mono. However, you may experience compatibility problems (I understand that this is less of a problem now than it used to be). –  Robin Green Apr 16 '11 at 20:39
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2 Answers

You can just utilize your school's front-end database/server interaction.

All documents stored on a school's computer do it.

Most schools allow things to be stored in a area accesible to all terminals using the server.

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If you use Java, to work with databases you need to use JDBC API You can take a look at JDBC tutorial But I'm not recommend to use Microsoft Access because you need to use bridge ODBC-JDBC to connect your app to database. You can you something small like Derby (part of JDK known as JavaDB). There is tutorial how you can use it with Netbeans

Good luck!

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