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I've been sat for hours trying to find the problem with MySQL syntax that ColdFusion is telling me I have, but I can't see it. Here is my query:

SELECT *
FROM message_table
WHERE useridto = #session.userid# AND read = 0

The error I'm getting is telling me:

"You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'read = '0'' at line 4"

And I have researched MySQL, checked past queries I have done that have IDENTICAL syntax and work. Have I missed something simple?

I should probably mention that #session.userid# does output properly, so it isn't that.

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closed as off-topic by Amal Murali, Ocramius, Chris Baker, Madara Uchiha, Omar May 2 '14 at 20:06

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Are you wrapping the values with apostrophes ' '? e.g. read = '0'? –  eandersson Apr 16 '11 at 21:30
    
The query you typed doesn't match the query in the error. I see a difference of read = 0 from read = '0' in the error message. Which is it? –  Cᴏʀʏ Apr 16 '11 at 21:31
    
yes sorry, I had tried with and without and found no difference. –  sean Apr 16 '11 at 21:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

read is a reserved keyword in MySQL:

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/reserved-words.html

This could cause issues as well. I would change your column name OR do the following:

SELECT *
FROM message_table
WHERE useridto = #session.userid# AND `read` = 0

An identifier may be quoted or unquoted. If an identifier contains special characters or is a reserved word, you must quote it whenever you refer to it
The identifier quote character is the backtick (“`”):

per: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/identifiers.html

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1  
In CF, surrounding a variable with '#' will output the variable's value. –  phixr Apr 16 '11 at 21:34
    
CF might properly qualify the session.userid with quotes when it does the replacement. My guess is read being a keyword or wrapping an integer in quotes is the problem. –  Cᴏʀʏ Apr 16 '11 at 21:35
1  
I don't think #session.userid# is his issue, since the MySQL error occurs at the read = '0'. –  Jimmy Sawczuk Apr 16 '11 at 21:40
    
Thanks for the quick responses guys. I think the answer above where read is a reserved word must be the problem as I have found if I am more specific with my field name (message_table.read) then it is quite happy. –  sean Apr 16 '11 at 21:49
    
Glad to hear. Good luck Sean! –  Mike Lewis Apr 16 '11 at 21:50

read is a MySQL keyword. Try surrounding it with backquotes (`):

SELECT * FROM message_table WHERE useridto = 5 AND `read` = 0
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