Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I can't see why my program is leaking, maybe you can spot it.

typedef boost::shared_ptr < std::string >   StringPtr;
typedef std::pair < HWND, StringPtr >       WMapPair; 
typedef std::map  < HWND, StringPtr >       WindowMap;

// this callback populates the WindowMap (m_Windows) by adding a WMapPair each time
BOOL CALLBACK EnumWindowsCallback( HWND hWnd )
{
    // adds this window to the WindowMap, along with its title text

    BOOL        bRetVal         = FALSE;
    int         nTextLen        = 0;
    char*       sWindowText     = NULL;     

    if( ! ::IsWindow( hWnd ) )
        return FALSE;

    nTextLen = GetWindowTextLength( hWnd );
    if( ! nTextLen )
        return TRUE;

    sWindowText = new char[nTextLen + 1];
    if( sWindowText )
    {
        GetWindowTextA( hWnd, sWindowText, nTextLen );

        m_Windows.insert( WMapPair(hWnd, StringPtr(new std::string(sWindowText))) );

        delete [] sWindowText;

        sWindowText = NULL;
        bRetVal     = TRUE;
    }

    return bRetVal;
}

My class contains this WindowMap population works correctly, but teardown doesn't seem to be working correctly. The class destructor calls this function to clear the map - which should release the shared_ptr's, thereby deleting them, right? :)

void EraseList()
{       
    m_Windows.clear();  
}

I'd love to know what I'm missing - all the StringPtr's are leaking.

UPDATE RE the comment that the "StringPtr(new std::string(sWindowText)))" was stylistically wrong, I made the suggested change, as below, but, the memory leak is still there.

BOOL CALLBACK EnumWindowsCallback( HWND hWnd )
{
    // adds this window to the WindowMap, along with its title text

    BOOL        bRetVal         = FALSE;
    int         nTextLen        = 0;
    char*       sWindowText     = NULL;     
    StringPtr   strPtr;     

    if( ! ::IsWindow( hWnd ) )
        return FALSE;

    nTextLen = GetWindowTextLength( hWnd );
    if( ! nTextLen )
        return TRUE;

    sWindowText = new char[nTextLen + 1];
    if( sWindowText )
    {
        GetWindowTextA( hWnd, sWindowText, nTextLen );

        strPtr = StringPtr(new std::string(sWindowText));

        m_Windows.insert( WMapPair(hWnd, strPtr) );

        delete [] sWindowText;

        sWindowText = NULL;
        bRetVal     = TRUE;
    }

    return bRetVal;
}

Conclusion I've gone with the suggestion of ditching StringPtr and using make_pair(hWnd, std::string()) and have sidestepped the issue that way.

share|improve this question
3  
This is stylistically wrong: StringPtr(new std::string(sWindowText)). Every new dynamically allocated object should be initially owned by a named smart pointer. For more, read the Boost shared_ptr best practices. Also, consider using a std::vector<char> instead of dynamically allocating the array yourself. I don't think either of these are the cause of your specific problem, though. – James McNellis Apr 17 '11 at 0:12
2  
@freefallr: No; when you have a std::map<int, std::string> m; and you do a m.insert(std::make_pair(0, std::string("Hello World")));, a copy of the temporary std::string("Hello World") is inserted into the std::map. – James McNellis Apr 17 '11 at 0:33
1  
Are you sure you don't have a circular reference? That is what boost::weak_ptr is for. – Sam Miller Apr 17 '11 at 1:54
1  
You need to resize the vector to be of sufficient size then you can get a pointer to its initial element using &v[0]. For example: std::vector<TCHAR> v(nTextLen + 1); GetWindowText(hWnd, &v[0], nTextLen); – James McNellis Apr 17 '11 at 2:40
4  
@freefallr - No it cannot! :-) The page you link to is for operator new which is an operator you can override to have some special memory allocation for a type. My page is about the new in a statment like new x. Even though they both use the word new, they mean different things. And I can assure you that new x will not return NULL, it will throw an exception. – Bo Persson Apr 17 '11 at 9:16
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Not going to answer your question (as I can;t see any problems) but a couple of points:

typedef std::map  < HWND, std::string >     WindowMap;
typedef WindowMap::value_type               WMapPair;    // In the future it may not be a pair.
                                                         // Or you may change the type of WindowMap
                                                         // Make it so the value is based on the container.
                                                         // Done automatically.

// this callback populates the WindowMap (m_Windows) by adding a WMapPair each time
BOOL CALLBACK EnumWindowsCallback( HWND hWnd )
{
    // adds this window to the WindowMap, along with its title text

    // Declare variables at there first usage point.
    // There is no need to clutter the top of the function 
    // With usless variables that may never be used.

    if( ! ::IsWindow( hWnd ) )
        return FALSE;

    int nTextLen = GetWindowTextLength( hWnd );
    if( ! nTextLen )
        return TRUE;

    // Use a vector. Dynamically allocating memory is dangerious and not
    // exception safe (unless you use a smart pointer (or in this case a container))
    std::vector<char>  sWindowText(nTextLen + 1);
    GetWindowTextA( hWnd, &sWindowText[0], nTextLen );

    // No need for shared pointers. Just put the string in the map.
    m_Windows.insert( WMapPair(hWnd, std::string(sWindowText.begin(),
                                                 sWindowText.begin()+ nTextLen)));

    return TRUE;
}
share|improve this answer
    
yeah, I went with this kind of approach (e.g. James' suggestion as stated earlier) – user206705 Apr 17 '11 at 20:35

There was (is?) a bug in VS2010 std::vector<> implementation causing memory to leak under certain circumstances (see here). AFAIK, it has been fixed in VS2010 SP1, but I'm not 100% positive.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the heads up, I wasn't aware of that! I do have VS2010 SP1 installed, and my problem seems to be with a map rather than with a vector. – user206705 Apr 17 '11 at 0:52
    
Nothing prevents map from using vector internally. – Puppy Apr 17 '11 at 15:51
    
I can confirm that this was fixed in SP1. – ildjarn Apr 18 '11 at 0:49

I've gone with James' suggestion:

@freefallr: No; when you have a std::map m; and you do a m.insert(std::make_pair(0, std::string("Hello World")));, a copy of the temporary std::string("Hello World") is inserted into the std::map. – James McNellis

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.