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I have some data into a string and I wish to store that data in an integer array... Below is the code.

int valMines[256];

// 'b' is NSString with 256 values in it.
for(int i=0; i<[b length]; i++){
valMines[i] =  [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d", [b characterAtIndex:i]];

NSLog(@"valMines1 is %@", valMines[i]);
}

I am getting a warning and due to that my application is not getting loaded: Assignment makes integer from pointer without a cast.

Please help

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1 Answer 1

Your valMins is an integer array and you are assigning NSString to it. Probably you are looking something like this:

unichar valMines[256];  // make it unichar instead of int

// 'b' is NSString with 256 values in it.
for(int i=0; i<[b length]; i++){
    valMines[i] =  [b characterAtIndex:i]; // get and store the unichar

    NSLog(@"valMines1 is %d", valMines[i]);  // format specifier is %d, not %@
}
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couldn't there be anyother way of storing it in int array... Issue is I have a whole big program coded and now its problem for me to change it... Making it an unichar array instead of int is giving me lots of warnings and error. –  user688175 Apr 17 '11 at 4:35
    
unichar is just a typedef for unsigned short integer. If that array is needed to be integer array for other places, you can leave that with int. There will be no problem with the above code. Just make it int valMins[256] instead of unichar valMins[256]. –  taskinoor Apr 17 '11 at 4:59
    
Hmm I tried it... but its giving me some junked values while priniting... sure it should be %d?? –  user688175 Apr 17 '11 at 5:05
    
What is the content of your string? What junked value you are getting? –  taskinoor Apr 17 '11 at 5:52
    
Content in my string is {-1-2-3-40134523} any integer +ve and -ve values in the range of -4 to +4... But when I print on console for valMine[0] its printing 45, valMine[1] 38, for valMine[2] 48 and so on... –  user688175 Apr 17 '11 at 5:58

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