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I'm thinking of creating a class in XNA 3.1 that handles the drawing of shadows. I know there are lots of ways to do this but I'm wanting to do something like a List of all the objects that should have a shadow and pass that List to the shadow class so it iterates through each object and draws a shadow.

The reason I want to do it like this is cause I could easily control whether shadows exist or not with just a boolean.

A List for all types is probably unlikely, my backup is a List of type Object but I don't know how to cast the elements in the List which are of type Object back into their respective types so I can access their properties.

My second backup is make all the objects that will have shadows derive from a class called ShadowObject or something and make the List of that type. This is a really easy solution but the reason I'm not doing it yet is cause I don't like the idea of a dummy class just to make something work, but maybe I should start liking it.

My final backup would be to go into each class that will have shadows and have a boolean to see if shadows should be drawn and handle the drawing in the class itself, which I think shouldn't even be considered an option cause if I want to change the shadow mechanics I would have to change it in every class.

So I guess a List for all types is my official question for the public but I'm open to answers, suggestions, and criticism to my backup plans.

Edit: I'm aware of interfaces but my response to that is in the comments for xixonia's answer and after reading up a little more on interfaces I think having a ShadowCaster class would be more appropriate. It can handle all the shadow drawing because all shadows are drawn the same way, I don't need to define it for each object individually like an interface would require me to.

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It sounds like an interface would do you justice. Are you familiar with interfaces? And if so, why is this not an option? –  Christopher Harris Apr 17 '11 at 4:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I believe you should use an interface, and make sure all of your "DrawShadow" methods match that interface. This way you can create a list of shadow casters that match the interface.

So long as an object implements that interface, you know you can tell it to draw a shadow. The actual drawing of the shadow will be left up to the object itself, provided the correct device to draw with.

For example:

class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        var shadowCasters = new List<ICastShadow>();

        shadowCasters.Add(new Car());
        shadowCasters.Add(new Plane());

        var castShadows = true;

        if (castShadows)
        {
            foreach (var caster in shadowCasters)
            {
                caster.DrawShadow(null); 
            }
        }

        Console.Read();
    }

    public class Car : ICastShadow
    {
        public void DrawShadow(object device)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Car Shadow!");
        }
    }

    public class Plane : ICastShadow
    {
        public void DrawShadow(object device)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Plane Shadow!");
        }
    }

    public interface IShadowCaster
    {
        void DrawShadow(object device);
    }
}

When you need to test if your object is capable of casting shadows, you can use the "is" keyword...

if(myTrain is ICastShadow)
{
    shadowCasters.Add(myTrain);
}

Hope this helps! :)

edit:

The reason you wouldn't want to use inheritance is if your game objects all draw shadows in different ways, and if some of your derived classes don't cast shadows. For instance:

You have a BrickBuilding and a GlassBuilding. Brick building should cast a shadow, and glass building should not. They both inherit from Building, which inherits from ShadowCaster. Even if all of your shadow-casting classes drew shadows the same way, you would still need to make ShadowCaster's methods virtual, so GlassBuilding could override them and do nothing when that method is called.

Using composition instead of inheritance (i.e: use an interface), you would be able to compose the shadow drawing method on only those classes that actually cast shadows, and you have one less class in your hierarchy (which makes maintainability a breeze).

So what happens when you use an interface and you start repeating the same logic over and over again because your shadow drawing classes all draw shadows the same way? Obviously this isn't the best idea. But if they're all drawing shadows the same way, you can use another class to draw shadows for them. Then comes the "ShadowCaster" class.

The shadow drawing implementation on each object would then call a method on this ShadowCaster to draw the shadow for it. This allows each object the option of drawing shadows in a different way, but also provides a way for each object to use the default shadow drawing implementation. It also provides a way to easily add and remove the ability to draw shadows for specific objects (simple don't let the objects implement the ICastShadow interface).

To take it one step further, you could treat shadow casting just like another drawing method, and create a generalized interface for drawing shadows / particles / reflections / tron-glow, etc, and created different "modules" that do these different things. Instead of having you class implement 'ICastShadows", have it implement "IDrawModules", and then give each class the correct modules at run time.

In other words, you can add a "CastShadow" module to BrickBuilding, and add a "Reflect" module to GlassBuilding, and have your code call "DrawModules" on both objects (from the IDrawModules interface).

Ok this is getting really really long, Hope this helps, and it's not too confusing.

I would suggest reading the first couple chapters of Head First Design Patterns. It's a java-based book, but the principles are the same for most languages.

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But how would this differ from creating a ShadowCaster class that Car and Plane derive from with a virtual method called DrawShadow? Because if I add them to a List <ShadowCaster> I don't need to check if they can cast shadows because they are already in the List. –  TreeTree Apr 17 '11 at 13:36
    
Favor composition over inheritance. What happens when you have a class "Building", and subclasses "GlassBuilding" and "BrickBuilding". If your building inherits from ShadowCaster, you will need to make the methods virtual, and you will need to override the GlassBuilding's shadow drawing method to remove the shadow casting code because GlassBuilding doesn't cast a shadow (in this example). If you use an interface, you don't have to worry about this, as you can have BrickBuilding implement ICastShadows without any effect on GlassBuilding. Favor composition over inheritance. –  Christopher Harris Apr 17 '11 at 15:55

Instead of a "dummy class" ShadowObject why don't you just create an interface IShadowObject that would expose all necessary methods and use:

List<IShadowObject>
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i don't know much about game development but it looks like System.Generic.Collection.List is supported by the XNA framework. That would be your list of any type.

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you can use "is" operator to check for type.

public bool check(object obj)
{
   return obj is ShadowStuff;
   // or obj.GetType() == ShadowStuff
}

to cast :

(ShawdowStuff) obj  ;
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