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I have a bug fix in my master, and I also want my branch to get that bug fix. What git command do I use?

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Why have you added "svn" as well in the tags? –  manojlds Apr 17 '11 at 4:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 55 down vote accepted

Assuming you're fine with taking all of the changes in master, what you want is:

git checkout <my branch>

To switch the working tree to your branch, and then

git merge master

To merge all the changes in master with yours.

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And this just adds the changes from my master into my branch, and leaves the master alone, correct? –  Nic Hubbard Apr 17 '11 at 4:59
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@Nic - This will bring in all the commits from master, not just the bug fix. Be sure if this is what you want to do. –  manojlds Apr 17 '11 at 5:03
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@Nic - Correct, this does not modify master. –  John Doty Apr 17 '11 at 5:07
    
Thanks for this, I thought the command rebase is for this use case, but this is a much cleaner solution than what I read about rebase. –  JustGoscha Nov 28 '14 at 12:07

If your branch is local only and hasn't been pushed to the server, use

git rebase master

Otherwise, use

git merge master
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why does rebase work only when it's a local branch? –  Denise Aug 2 '11 at 21:27
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Because it modifies the commit history, and you don't want to push modified search history to the server. –  Chetan Aug 3 '11 at 0:05
    
If you are using a svn repository as your remote repository—via git svn—then the git rebase master is the way to go, to keep a linear history, which is what svn understands. –  alondono Mar 18 at 6:31

You can use the cherry-pick to get the particular bug fix commit(s)

$ git checkout branch
$ git cherry-pick bugfix
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will the cherry-pick only work if bugfix was a branch that was merged back into master? –  Prasith Govin May 9 '13 at 14:54
    
You can cherry-pick, but then after merging the branch into master (when the branch is ready) you will have the bug-fixing commit twice in the history. –  Gauthier Feb 27 at 8:45

If you just want the bug fix to be integrated into the branch, git cherry-pick the relevant commit(s).

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