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Input

row.no   column2    column3  column4
1        bb         ee       up
2        bb         ee       down
3        bb         ee       up
4        bb         yy       down
5        bb         zz       up

I have a rule to remove row 1 and 2 and 3, as while column2 and column3 for row 1, 2 and 3 are the same, contradictory data (up and down) are found in column 4.

How can I ask R to remove those rows with same name in column2 and column3 but contracting column 3 to result a matrix as follows:

row.no   column2    column3  column4
4        bb         yy       down
5        bb         zz       up
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The functions in package plyr really shine at this type of problem. Here is a solution using two lines of code.

Set up the data (kindly provided by @GavinSimpson)

dat <- structure(list(row.no = 1:5, column2 = structure(c(1L, 1L, 1L, 
1L, 1L), .Label = "bb", class = "factor"), column3 = structure(c(1L, 
1L, 1L, 2L, 3L), .Label = c("ee", "yy", "zz"), class = "factor"), 
    column4 = structure(c(2L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 2L), .Label = c("down", 
    "up"), class = "factor")), .Names = c("row.no", "column2", 
"column3", "column4"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, 
-5L))

Load the plyr package

library(plyr)

Use ddply to split, analyse and combine dat. The following line of code analyses splits dat into unique combination of (column2 and column3) separately. I then add a column called unique, which calculates the number of unique values of column4 for each set. Finally, use a simple subsetting to return only those lines where unique==1, and drop column 5.

df <- ddply(dat, .(column2, column3), transform, 
    row.no=row.no, unique=length(unique(column4)))
df[df$unique==1, -5]

And the results:

  row.no column2 column3 column4
4      4      bb      yy    down
5      5      bb      zz      up
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+1 for using plyr –  Gavin Simpson Apr 17 '11 at 9:37
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Here is one potential, if somewhat inelegant, solution

out <- with(dat, split(dat, interaction(column2, column3)))
out <- lapply(out, function(x) if(NROW(x) > 1) {NULL} else {data.frame(x)})
out <- out[!sapply(out, is.null)]
do.call(rbind, out)

Which gives:

> do.call(rbind, out)
      row.no column2 column3 column4
bb.yy      4      bb      yy    down
bb.zz      5      bb      zz      up

Some explanation, line by line:

  • Line 1: splits the data into a list, each component of which is a data frame with rows corresponding to groups formed by unique combinations of column2 and column3.
  • Line 2: iterate over the result from Line 1; if there are more than 1 row in data frame, return NULL, if not return the 1-row data frame.
  • Line 3: iterate over the output from Line 2; return only non-NULL components
  • Line 4: need to bind, row-wise, the output from Line 3, which we arrange via do.call()

This can be simplified to two lines, combining Lines 1-3 into a single line:

out <- lapply(with(dat, split(dat, interaction(column2, column3))),
              function(x) if(NROW(x) > 1) {NULL} else {data.frame(x)})
do.call(rbind, out[!sapply(out, is.null)])

The above was all done with:

dat <- structure(list(row.no = 1:5, column2 = structure(c(1L, 1L, 1L, 
1L, 1L), .Label = "bb", class = "factor"), column3 = structure(c(1L, 
1L, 1L, 2L, 3L), .Label = c("ee", "yy", "zz"), class = "factor"), 
    column4 = structure(c(2L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 2L), .Label = c("down", 
    "up"), class = "factor")), .Names = c("row.no", "column2", 
"column3", "column4"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, 
-5L))
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Thank you Gavin, when I type the first line, I found the following error message "Error in sort.list(y) : 'x' must be atomic for 'sort.list' Have you called 'sort' on a list?" Could you mind to teach me how to solve this problem? –  Catherine Apr 17 '11 at 7:27
    
@sally I read in the snippet of data you showed - it is in a data frame named dat - code to create dat are now included in my Answer. You don't say how your data are stored, so I used the logical data structure (a data frame). –  Gavin Simpson Apr 17 '11 at 7:39
    
+1 For using base R –  Andrie Apr 17 '11 at 9:04
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Gavin keeps raising the bar on the quality of answers. Here's my attempt.

# This is one way of importing the data into R
sally <- textConnection("row.no   column2    column3  column4
1        bb         ee       up
2        bb         ee       down
3        bb         ee       up
4        bb         yy       down
5        bb         zz       up")
sally <- read.table(sally, header = TRUE)

# Order the data frame to make rle work its magic
sally <- sally[order(sally$column3, sally$column4), ]

# Find which values are repeating
sally.rle2 <- rle(as.character(sally$column2))
sally.rle3 <- rle(as.character(sally$column3))
sally.rle4 <- rle(as.character(sally$oclumn4))

sally.can.wait2 <- sally.rle2$values[which(sally.rle3$lengths != 1)]
sally.can.wait3 <- sally.rle3$values[which(sally.rle3$lengths != 1)]
sally.can.wait4 <- sally.rle4$values[which(sally.rle4$lengths != 1)]

# Find which lines have values that are repeating
dup <- c(which(sally$column2 == sally.can.wait2),
         which(sally$column3 == sally.can.wait3),
         which(sally$column4 == sally.can.wait4))
dup <- dup[duplicated(dup)]

# Display the lines that have no repeating values
sally[-dup, ]
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+1 For using rle –  Andrie Apr 17 '11 at 9:04
    
+1 Interesting use of rle(). Could you not use lapply() to arrange the rle() calls? And indeed for the subsequent repeated code? –  Gavin Simpson Apr 17 '11 at 9:38
    
@Gavin, true. Whenever you create a few objects done in a similar fashion, you can usually use the apply family of functions. –  Roman Luštrik Apr 17 '11 at 10:03
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You can try one of the following two methods. Suppose the table is called 'table1'.

Method 1

repeated_rows = c();
for (i in 1:(nrow(table1)-1)){
  for (j in (i+1):nrow(table1)){
    if (sum((table1[i,2:3] == table1[j,2:3])) == 2){
      repeated_rows = c(repeated_rows, i, j)
    }
  }
}
repeated_rows = unique(repeated_rows)
table1[-repeated_rows,]

Method 2

duplicates = duplicated(table1[,2:3])
for (i in 1:length(duplicates)){
  if (duplicates[i] == TRUE){
    for (j in 1:nrow(table1)){
      if (sum(table1[i,2:3] == table1[j,2:3]) == 2){
        duplicates[j] = TRUE;
      }
    }
  }
}
table1[!duplicates,]
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