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I tried to use compound conditions in the correlated subquery, but it didn't return the result expected. Can you look into the example below to see why the first query doesn't work out but the second query works out?

Create table & populate rows:

CREATE TABLE TestCase
(
    Seq INT IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY,
    ID INT,
    Name VARCHAR(50)
)


INSERT INTO TestCase
VALUES
(100, 'MJ'),
(110, 'MJ'),
(120, 'AK'),
(130, 'AK')

First query:

SELECT A.ID, A.Name FROM TestCase AS A
WHERE A.ID IN (SELECT ID FROM TestCase WHERE ID <> A.ID AND Name = A.Name)

(0 row(s) affected)

Second query with EXISTS:

SELECT A.ID, A.Name FROM TestCase AS A
WHERE EXISTS (SELECT ID FROM TestCase WHERE ID <> A.ID AND Name = A.Name)

(4 row(s) affected)

Supposedly, both queries should return all four rows but the first one did not; I am not sure why only the second query returned four rows. Can someone help? Thank you.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The reason the first query is returning 0 records is because you are trying to match the row's ID to the rows returned by the subquery, A.ID IN (...), but the subquery correlates to exclude all ID's equal to the current record (A.ID<>ID). So, the WHERE IN clause will always evaluate to false.

The second query is not trying to match the returned rows with A.ID, but only that there exists a row with a different ID but with the same name.

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+1 Had to read it several times to actually get it but it makes sense now. Yet another reason why I don't like (or grasp) negated conditions... –  Lieven Keersmaekers Apr 17 '11 at 7:52

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