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I have a simple ajax form and I'm trying to validate that it

  1. has a value
  2. that value is a 10 digit number

I'm trying to use RegEx to do so. Here is what I have so far.

var reg = new RegExp("/[0-9]{10}/");
$("#call_form").bind("submit", function() {
       if ($("#call_number").val().length < 1 && reg.test($("#call_number").val())) {
               $("#call_error").show();
                return false;
        }
});

I know the problem has to do witht he RegExp as if I remove this portion of the code it validates that the box has a value.

EDIT: Here is the final regex I'm using

var regEx = new RegExp("/[0-9]/");

$("#call_form").bind("submit", function() {

    if ($("#call_number").val().length != 10 && !$("#call_number").val().match(regEx)) {
        $("#call_error").show();
        $.fancybox.resize();
        return false;
    }
});

EDIT 2 Using the suggestions here is what i'm usign which allows spaces and dashes that then get stripped on check

    $("#call_form").bind("submit", function() {
var Phone = $("#call_number").val().replace(/\D+/g,'');

if (Phone.length != 10) {
        $("#call_error").show();
        $.fancybox.resize();
        return false;

    }
});
share|improve this question
    
That regex will only check to see if there's at least one number in the string. You should keep the {10} to ensure that it's all numbers. –  tjameson Apr 17 '11 at 7:59
    
@tjameson Ok, If I keep the {10} I should be able to ditch the length != 10 right? or is it better not to? –  BandonRandon Apr 17 '11 at 8:04
    
Yeah, but you should have both. reg.test will return true if the regexp matches any part of the string. –  tjameson Apr 17 '11 at 8:06
1  
Or you could anchor your RegExp using ^ and $: /^[0-9]{10}$/ I think is the syntax. –  tjameson Apr 17 '11 at 8:07
3  
I'd like to also point out that you seem to be ignoring the fact that people LOVE to put (555)555-5555 etc into phone number fields, I personally use 555.555.5555 all the time when typing my number into forms and hate it when some poorly written regexp denies me... I would suggest not validating the field at all, especially when you must consider +44 02 5555 5555 as well... You could also just .replace(/\D+/g,'') on the string to remove all non-numbers then check .length >= 10 to ensure at least 10 numbers... –  gnarf Apr 17 '11 at 9:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your regex works fine for me... you could shorten it to just /[0-9]{10}/.

Your problem is here:

$("#call_number").val().length < 1. If the number is 10 characters long, it will never be less than 1, no?

You probably meant something like this:

$("#call_number").val().length === 10

share|improve this answer
    
So true, I went with a combination of both answers. –  BandonRandon Apr 17 '11 at 7:55
1  
Should be /^\d{10}$/ -- need the anchors if you want to ensure nothing else, otherwise 11 numbers would pass, and so would 12 letters, 10 numbers, then some symbols –  gnarf Apr 17 '11 at 9:16
    
Yeah, the \d is simpler. In the comments to the question I gave him the anchors. –  tjameson Apr 17 '11 at 9:18

No one has said what was wrong with your original effort - it's the slashes (/). When calling RegExp as a constructor, you don't need the slashes (which are a token to indicate a regular expression litteral), e.g.:

var re = /\w+/i;

is equivalent to:

var re = new RegExp('\\w+','i');

Note that you have to quote backslashes for special characters.

One last thing - allow spaces in the number. You might remove them before testing or storing though. Users find it much easier to read numbers in blocks of 3 or 4 digits, e.g.

  • 1234 871 098 is easier to read than 1234871098.
share|improve this answer
    
Nice catch! I totally just read over it without flagging it... ;) –  gnarf Apr 17 '11 at 9:43

Here is what I use - its simple, just posting if someone is searching for the same.

var a = PHONE_FROM_FIELD;
var filter = /^[0-9-+]+$/;
if (filter.test(a)) {
     return true;
}
else {
     return false;
}

Cheers!

share|improve this answer

something like this:

var regEx = /^(\+\d)*\s*(\(\d{3}\)\s*)*\d{3}(-{0,1}|\s{0,1})\d{2}(-{0,1}|\s{0,1})\d{2}$/;
$("#call_form").bind("submit", function() {
       var val = $("#call_number").val();
       if (!val.match(regEx)) {
            $("#call_error").show();
            return false;
        }
});
share|improve this answer
    
This regex is more complete and will parse the dashes it looks like. Watch out though, match returns an array of matches. –  tjameson Apr 17 '11 at 7:44
    
I edited the question to include the solution. I went with simple regex just means no spaces. –  BandonRandon Apr 17 '11 at 7:55

// check phone number validation function validatePhoneNumber(number) { count=number.length; if(number[0]!=" " && number[0]!="-" && number[count-1]!=" " && number[count-1]!="-") { temp=number.replace(" ", ""); temp=temp.replace("-", ""); if($.isNumeric(temp)) { if(temp.length>=7 && temp.length<=12) { flag=1; for(i=1;i if(number[i]=="-" || number[i]==" ") { if(number[i-1]=="-" || number[i-1]==" " || number[i+1]=="-" || number[i+1]==" ") { flag=0; } }
}

                    if(flag==1)
                    {
                        valid=1;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        valid=0;
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    valid=0;
                }
            }
            else
            {

                valid=0;
            }

        }
        else
        {
            valid=0;
        }
        return valid;
    }
share|improve this answer

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