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Given n = 2^k, how can I find k assuming n is 32-bit integer using C/C++ bitwise?

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Is this homework? –  jalf Apr 17 '11 at 8:30
2  
Is the standard c++ log2 function really that slow? –  TommyA Apr 17 '11 at 8:34
    
@jalf: Of course, this is not homework. @TommyA: I knew log2, just curious about how to do it using bitwise operations. –  Chan Apr 17 '11 at 8:37
6  
homework doesn't explicitly mean stuff your teacher tells you to do. When you do something for your excercise, you should also tag it homework. It's like a hint for us to provide you enough to find the solution, but not to just present you the solution. –  Xeo Apr 17 '11 at 8:56
    
@Xeo: It's just something that I read, and realized what could I do to solve it better. It's just a hobby of solving problems, what hint could you get from a tag if this was not homework? To me homework meant assignment from classes. Thank you. –  Chan Apr 18 '11 at 16:21

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, you could use the fact that the binary exponent is explicitly stored in floating point numbers:

unsigned log2(unsigned x)
{
    float f = x;
    memcpy(&x, &f, sizeof x);
    return (x >> 23) - 127;
}

I don't know how fast this is, and it surely is not the most portable solution, but I find it quite interesting.

And just for fun, here is a completely different, relatively straightforward solution:

unsigned log2(unsigned x)
{
    unsigned exp = 0;
    for (; ;)
    {
        switch (x)
        {
            case 128: ++exp;
            case 64: ++exp;
            case 32: ++exp;
            case 16: ++exp;
            case 8: ++exp;
            case 4: ++exp;
            case 2: ++exp;
            case 1: return exp;
            case 0: throw "illegal input detected";
        }
        x >>= 8;
        exp += 8;
    }
}

And here is a completely unrolled solution:

#define CASE(exp) case (1 << (exp)) : return (exp);

unsigned log2(unsigned x)
{
    switch (x)
    {
        CASE(31) CASE(30) CASE(29) CASE(28)
        CASE(27) CASE(26) CASE(25) CASE(24)
        CASE(23) CASE(22) CASE(21) CASE(20)
        CASE(19) CASE(18) CASE(17) CASE(16)
        CASE(15) CASE(14) CASE(13) CASE(12)
        CASE(11) CASE(10) CASE( 9) CASE( 8)
        CASE( 7) CASE( 6) CASE( 5) CASE( 4)
        CASE( 3) CASE( 2) CASE( 1) CASE( 0)
        default: throw "illegal input";
    }
}
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+1 for interesting, -1 for not answering his question for fastest. So break even 0 :P –  Daniel Apr 17 '11 at 9:03
    
+1 The first one was nice. –  Chan Apr 18 '11 at 16:16

GCC has __builtin_clz that translates to BSR on x86/x64, CLZ on ARM, etc. and emulates the instruction if the hardware does not implement it.
Visual C++ 2005 and up has _BitScanReverse.

Using those functions, you can get your k

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Wikipedia writes how to do it using bitwise operators:

/**
 * Returns the floor form of binary logarithm for a 32 bit integer.
 * −1 is returned if ''n'' is 0.
 */
int floorLog2(unsigned int n) {
  if (n == 0)
    return -1;

  int pos = 0;
  if (n >= 1<<16) { n >>= 16; pos += 16; }
  if (n >= 1<< 8) { n >>=  8; pos +=  8; }
  if (n >= 1<< 4) { n >>=  4; pos +=  4; }
  if (n >= 1<< 2) { n >>=  2; pos +=  2; }
  if (n >= 1<< 1) {           pos +=  1; }
  return pos;
}

Code taken from: Wikipedia on: Binary Logarithm this page has since been altered the original version with the code sample can still be found her: Wikipedia on: Binary Logarithm (24 May 2011)

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keep on right-shifting the value n till u get get 1.count the number of right shifts required.

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For a portable solution (without resorting to implementation-specific stuff), you can use binary chop which is probably one of the most efficient ways not involving non-portable stuff. For example, say your integer is 8 bits:

// Given n = 2^k, k >= 0, returns k.

unsigned int getK (unsigned int n) {
    if (n <= 8) {
        if (n <= 2) {
            if (n == 1) return 0;
            return 1;
        }
        if (n == 4) return 2;
        return 3;
    }
    if (n <= 32) {
        if (n == 16) return 4;
        return 5;
    }
    if (n == 64) return 6;
    return 7;
}

That gets a little unwieldy as the integer size increases but you only have to write it once :-)

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Why expand every block? if (n == 64) return 6; would suffice without code bloat. Also, why static? –  Daniel Apr 17 '11 at 8:52
    
@Daniel, yes, but then it wouldn't be as efficient. If you checked 1, 2, 4, 8, etc and the value was 2^31, it would take 31 if statements. This method (binary chop) takes much less (5, I think). You can see that in the 8-bit code - it delivers a result with 3 if statements rather than up to 8. –  paxdiablo Apr 17 '11 at 8:52
    
My suggestion makes no logical changes to the code... it was purely syntactical... –  Daniel Apr 17 '11 at 8:54
    
@pax: I think he meant why everything on a new line? :) –  Xeo Apr 17 '11 at 8:54
    
Ah, sorry, misunderstood. Good point, changing it right now. –  paxdiablo Apr 17 '11 at 8:55

Given: 0 <= n <= 2**32 that means 0 <= k <= 32 and k can be represented by a byte. 2**32 bytes of RAM is not exhorbitant in general, so the fastest method of calculation might well be a simple table lookup.

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2**32 bytes of RAM is 4GB which I definitely consider exhorbitant. You could split the 32 bits into two 16 bit quantities and add together two lookups, that would only take 128K. That's still a lot of overhead for such a simple problem. –  Mark Ransom Oct 3 '13 at 22:04
    
@MarkRansom: You have to admit that it is likely to be fast if that amount of ram is available. It is left to the original poster to work out what further trade-offs may be required, but my compute cluster has Linux boxes, most with 32Gig of ram or more; mind you, I can't think of a case where I might be tempted to give up 4Gig for this calculation :-) –  Paddy3118 Oct 4 '13 at 6:34

If you use GCC, I guess that this is the fastest way:

int ilog2(int value) {
 return 31 - __builtin_clz(value);
}

Where __builtin_clz is an optimized GCC builtin function.

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