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Why does this code:

function answer(x) {
  function closure() {
    var x = x || 42;
    console.log(x);
  }
  closure();
}
foo();

always prints 42?

The logic would be that something like foo(31337) would print 31337, since in closure x would be 31337, so x || 42 would evaluate to 31337. But this is not the case.

I just can't figure this out, so I'm posting this here in hope of receiving enlightenment from one of the true javascript gurus out there.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
function answer(x) {
  function closure() {
    var x = x || 42;
    console.log(x);
  }
  closure();
}
answer(20);

inside closure your defining x as a local variable. This means it shadows the argument x from the answer function higher up the chain. Since you declared x with a var statement it defaults to undefined.

Then x || 42 is undefined || 42 which is 42.

The issue here is that your using the same name. If you did x = x || 42 it would be x = 28 || 42 which sets x to 28.

The distinction is using the var statement to create a new function local variable named x. Once you've done that, there is no way to reference variables of the same name that are higher up the scope chain.

To clarify how the interpreter works. Something like this :

function() {
    var x = 52;
    foo();
    function foo() {
        ...
    }
}

Gets converted into

function() {
    function foo() {

    }
    var x;
    x = 52;
    foo();
}
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so you say that var x = x || 42; is the same thing as var x; x = x || 42;, which would imply that var x = (...) x is declared as a local variable before executing (...)? –  NeuronQ Apr 17 '11 at 13:21
    
@NeuronQ exactly. To clarify all var statements get hoisted upto the top of scope. See edit. –  Raynos Apr 17 '11 at 13:22
    
thanks, it really makes sense now :) –  NeuronQ Apr 17 '11 at 13:29

var x in var x = x || 42; shadows the argument. And since var ... is always parsed at the beginning of the function - i.e. before the assignment is executed, the outer x is never available in there.

Here's a better example:

(function(x) {
    (function() {
        alert(x);
        var x = 'inside';
    })();
})(123);

The execution order is basically:

  • Define var x with value undefined
  • Execute alert(x)
  • Assign 'inside' to x
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