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So in java I have a string like this "0564\n5523\n5445\n8596" and I'd like more or less to make a table like this :

. * . .
* * . .
* . . *
. * . .

In which * means it's equal to 5 and . means it's not equal to 5.

The base string is directly extracted from a text file (still don't know how I will do that, but if someone has simple and clear documentation about it... ;-) ).

The method I want to do is something like this (I know the initial dimensions of the table and the string will always match the dimensions)

int counter = 0;
for (int r=0;r<size;r++)
{
    for (int c=0;c<size;c++)
    {
        if thestring.charAt(counter)=='5' 
        {
            thetable[c][r]='*';
        }
        else
        {
            thetable[c][r]='.';
        }
        counter++;
    }
    counter = counter+2; //To skip the \n.
}

So basically my first question is "Is there an other way to do it?" I quite don't like that one, because "skipping" the characters I don't want to evaluate seems lame.

The second question (I just want to make sure) is "Is \n considered as 2 characters in the string?"

The last question is more about text files, if the text file I extract the string from is on windows won't the string be like "0564\r\n5523\r\n5445\r\n8596" ?

Thank you for your time.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

1st question: Why not just do a replaceAll? i.e.

str.replaceAll("5", "*").replaceAll("[0-9]", ".")

2nd question: "\n" is treated as one character.

3rd question: If it was created in Windows.

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Well I didn't use replaceAll because it's in fact more complicated than that, instead of modifying the table at every iteration I call a method on an object that contain the table. Because the table is private in the whole program. –  Sword22 Apr 17 '11 at 15:54
    
Remember that Strings are immutable: replaceAll will return a new String rather than changing the old one in place. –  Jacob Apr 17 '11 at 17:21
    
Yeah but doing "if thestring.charAt(counter)=='5'" is the same as doing "if thestring.charAt(counter)=='*'". –  Sword22 Apr 17 '11 at 18:14

Homework?

public class d {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    String s = "0564\n5523\n5445\n8596";
    System.out.println(s.replaceAll("[^5\n]", ".")
      .replace('5', '*')
      .replaceAll("(.)(?!\n|$)", "$1 ")
      .replaceAll("(\r|\n|\r\n)", System.getProperty("line.separator")));
  }
}
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