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I have read that a standard conversion can precede or follow a conversion implemented by a conversion operator or a contructor type conversion. On the other hand, a sequence of two conversion operators is not allowed
a sequence of two contructor type conversions is not allowed

I set out to test this and got a different result. I am using MSVC2010

In the first bunch code this fails: int b1 = sMe; which is great as it implies a sequence of two conversion operators: one from myString to myType and the other from myType to int

In the second bunch code this DOESNT fail: myString sYou(b); although I believe it implies a sequence of two constructor conversions: one from int to myType, the other from myType to myString.

Can somebody explain to me what I am missing?

Many Thanks,

FIRST BUNCH

class myType {
public:
    myType(): val(10) {}
    myType(const myType &orig): val(orig.val) {}
    myType(int v1): val(v1) {} 

    bool hasSameValue(const myType &o2) {
        return (o2.val == val); }
    int getVal() {
        return val; }
    operator int() { return val; }

private:
    int val;

};


#include <string>
class myString {
public:
    myString(): val("I Dont Know you") {}
    myString(const myString &orig): val(orig.val) {}
    myString(myType v1): val("Really Dont know you") {} 

    bool hasSameValue(const myString &o2) {
        return (o2.val == val); }
    std::string getVal() {
        return val; }
    std::string getString() {return val;}

    operator myType() { return 1000; }


private:
    std::string val;

};




#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {

    int b = 36;

    myString sMe;
    myString sYou(b);
    cout << "sYou: " << sYou.getString() << endl;
    cout << "sMe: " << sMe.getString() << endl;

    myType a = sMe;
    cout << a.getVal() << endl;
    int b1 = sMe;

    return 1;

}

SECOND BUNCH

class myType {
public:
    myType(): val(10) {}
    myType(const myType &orig): val(orig.val) {}
    myType(int v1): val(v1) {} 

    bool hasSameValue(const myType &o2) {
        return (o2.val == val); }
    int getVal() {
        return val; }

private:
    int val;

};


#include <string>
class myString {
public:
    myString(): val("I Dont Know you") {}
    myString(const myString &orig): val(orig.val) {}
    myString(myType v1): val("Really, I Dont Know you") {} 

    bool hasSameValue(const myString &o2) {
        return (o2.val == val); }
    std::string getVal() {
        return val; }
    std::string getString() {return val;}


private:
    std::string val;

};




#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    myType me;
    int a = 34;
    int b = 36;

    myType you(a);
    bool sameVal = you.hasSameValue(b);  
    cout << sameVal << endl;
    cout << "you: " << you.getVal() << endl;
    cout << "me: " << me.getVal() << endl;

    myString sMe;
    myString sYou(b);
    cout << "sYou: " << sYou.getString() << endl;
    cout << "sMe: " << sMe.getString() << endl;


    return 1;

}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

myString sYou(b); only involves one implicit conversion. The second conversion is explicit; you're calling the constructor. So it compiles.

Conversely, the following will not compile:

void func(myString blah) { ... }

func(b);

as this would require two implicit conversions.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Oli, so essentially the fact that the operands are matched in the second conversion make it legal. Only a sequence of two constructor conversions are not legal obly when they are both implict. Is that correct? –  RandomCPlusPlus Apr 17 '11 at 16:35
    
@Random: That's exactly it. The compiler will only make one implicit conversion in order to satisfy the argument list. –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 17 '11 at 16:36
    
@oli: arent both conversions in the first bunch code also explicit because of the existence of the conversion operator? If that is correct, they still dont compile –  RandomCPlusPlus Apr 17 '11 at 16:39
1  
@Random: "Implicit" in this context means that the compiler has to infer what to do from the context, rather than being explicitly told. So in the first example, the compiler would have to infer myString->myType->int, whereas in the second example, it only has to infer int->myType. –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 17 '11 at 16:43

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